Metabolomic Tools for Secondary Metabolite Discovery from Marine Microbial Symbionts

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-116097
  • Marine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strainMarine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strain selection by investigating differences in the chemical profiles of 77 bacterial extracts isolated from cold water marine invertebrates from Orkney, Scotland using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Following mass spectrometric analysis and dereplication using an Excel macro developed in-house, principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to differentiate the bacterial strains based on their chemical profiles. NMR H-1 and correlation spectroscopy (COSY) were also employed to obtain a chemical fingerprint of each bacterial strain and to confirm the presence of functional groups and spin systems. These results were then combined with taxonomic identification and bioassay screening data to identify three bacterial strains, namely Bacillus sp. 4117, Rhodococcus sp. ZS402 and Vibrio splendidus strain LGP32, to prioritize for scale-up based on their chemically interesting secondary metabolomes, established through dereplication and interesting bioactivities, determined from bioassay screening.show moreshow less

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Author: Lynsey Macintyre, Tong Zhang, Christina Viegelmann, Ignacio Juarez Martinez, Cheng Cheng, Catherine Dowdells, Usama Ramadan Abdelmohsen, Christine Gernert, Ute Hentschel, RuAngelie Edrada-Ebel
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-116097
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Marine Drugs
ISSN:1660-3397
Year of Completion:2014
Volume:12
Issue:6
Pagenumber:3416-3448
Source:Marine Drugs 2014, 12, 3416-3448; doi:10.3390/md12063416
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/md12063416
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=24905482
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Tag:NMR; bryozoan bugula-neritina; dereplication; mass spectrometry; metabolic profiling; metabolomics; multivariate analysis; polyketide synthase gene; sponge holicolona-simulans; symbiotic bacteria
Release Date:2015/07/21
EU-Project number / Contract (GA) number:311932
OpenAIRE:OpenAIRE
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung