Safer without Sex?

Safer without Sex?

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-1977
  • Highly eusocial insect societies, such as all known ants, are typically characterized by a reproductive division of labor between queens, who are inseminated and reproduce, and virgin workers, who engage in foraging, nest maintenance and brood care. In most species workers have little reproductive options left: They usually produce haploid males by arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, both in the queenright and queenless condition. In the phylogenetically primitive subfamily Ponerinae reproductive caste dimorphism is much less pronounced: OvarianHighly eusocial insect societies, such as all known ants, are typically characterized by a reproductive division of labor between queens, who are inseminated and reproduce, and virgin workers, who engage in foraging, nest maintenance and brood care. In most species workers have little reproductive options left: They usually produce haploid males by arrhenotokous parthenogenesis, both in the queenright and queenless condition. In the phylogenetically primitive subfamily Ponerinae reproductive caste dimorphism is much less pronounced: Ovarian morphology is rather similar in queens and workers, which additionally retain a spermatheca. In many ponerine species workers mate and may have completely replaced the queen caste. This similarity in reproductive potential provides for the evolution of diverse reproductive systems. In addition, it increases the opportunity for reproductive conflicts among nestmates substantially. Only in a handful of ant species, including Platythyrea punctata, workers are also able to rear diploid female offspring from unfertilized eggs by thelytokous parthenogenesis. The small ponerine ant P. punctata (Smith) is the only New World member of the genus reaching as far north as the southern USA, with its center of distribution in Central America and the West Indies. P. punctata occurs in a range of forest habitats including subtropical hardwood forests as well as tropical rain forests. In addition to queens, gamergates and thelytokous workers co-occur in the same species. This remarkable complexity of reproductive strategies makes P. punctata unique within ants and provides an ideal model system for the investigation of reproductive conflicts within the female caste. Colonies are usually found in rotten branches on the forest floor but may also be present in higher strata. Colonies contained on average 60 workers, with a maximum colony size of 148 workers. Queens were present in only ten percent of the colonies collected from Florida, but completely absent both from the populations studied in Barbados and Puerto Rico. Males were generally rare. In addition, morphological intermediates between workers and queens (so-called intercastes) were found in 16 colonies collected in Florida. Their thorax morphology varied from an almost worker-like to an almost queen-like thorax structure. Queen and intercaste size, however, did not differ from those of workers. Although workers taken from colonies directly after collection from the field engaged in aggressive interactions, nestmate discrimination ceased in the laboratory suggesting that recognition cues used are derived from the environment. Only one of six queens dissected was found to be inseminated but not fertile. Instead, in most queenless colonies, a single uninseminated worker monopolized reproduction by means of thelytokous parthenogenesis. A single mated, reproductive worker (gamergate) was found dominating reproduction in the presence of an inseminated alate queen only in one of the Florida colonies. The regulation of reproduction was closely examined in ten experimental groups of virgin laboratory-reared workers, in which one worker typically dominated reproduction by thelytoky despite the presence of several individuals with elongated, developing ovaries. In each group only one worker was observed to oviposit. Conflict over reproduction was intense consisting of ritualized physical aggression between some nestmates including antennal boxing, biting, dragging, leap and immobilization behaviors. The average frequency of interactions was low. Aggressive interactions allowed to construct non-linear matrices of social rank. On average, only five workers were responsible for 90 percent of total agonistic interactions. In 80 percent of the groups the rate of agonistic interactions increased after the experimental removal of the reproductive worker. While antennal boxing and biting were the most frequent forms of agonistic behaviors both before and after the removal, biting and dragging increased significantly after the removal indicating that agonistic interactions increased in intensity. Once a worker obtains a high social status it is maintained without the need for physical aggression. The replacement of reproductives by another worker did however not closely correlate with the new reproductive's prior social status. Age, however, had a profound influence on the individual rate of agonistic interactions that workers initiated. Especially younger adults (up to two month of age) and callows were responsible for the increase in observed aggression after the supersedure of the old reproductive. These individuals have a higher chance to become reproductive since older, foraging workers may not be able to develop their ovaries. Aggressions among older workers ceased with increasing age. Workers that already started to develop their ovaries should pose the greatest threat to any reproductive individual. Indeed, dissection of all experimental group revealed that aggression was significantly more often directed towards both individuals with undeveloped and developing ovaries as compared to workers that had degenerated ovaries. In all experimental groups reproductive dominance was achieved by callows or younger workers not older than four month. Age is a better predictor of reproductive dominance than social status as inferred from physical interactions. Since no overt conflict between genetical identical individuals is expected, in P. punctata the function of agonistic interactions in all-worker colonies, given the predominance of thelytokous parthenogenesis, remains unclear. Physical aggression could alternatively function to facilitate a smooth division of non-reproductive labor thereby increasing overall colony efficiency. Asexuality is often thought to constitute an evolutionary dead end as compared with sexual reproduction because genetic recombination is limited or nonexistent in parthenogenetic populations. Microsatellite markers were developed to investigate the consequences of thelytokous reproduction on the genetic structure of four natural populations of P. punctata. In the analysis of 314 workers taken from 51 colonies, low intraspecific levels of variation at all loci, expressed both as the number of alleles detected and heterozygosities observed, was detected. Surprisingly, there was almost no differentiation within populations. Populations rather had a clonal structure, with all individuals from all colonies usually sharing the same genotype. This low level of genotypic diversity reflects the predominance of thelytoky under natural conditions in four populations of P. punctata. In addition, the specificity of ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci developed for P. punctata was investigated in 29 ant species comprising four different subfamilies by cross-species amplification. Positive amplification was only obtained in a limited number of species indicating that sequences flanking the hypervariable region are often not sufficiently conserved to allow amplification, even within the same genus. The karyotype of P. punctata (2n = 84) is one of the highest chromosome numbers reported in ants so far. A first investigation did not show any indication of polyploidy, a phenomenon which has been reported to be associated with the occurrence of parthenogenesis. Thelytokous parthenogenesis does not appear to be a very common phenomenon in the Hymenoptera. It is patchily distributed and restricted to taxa at the distant tips of phylogenies. Within the Formicidae, thelytoky has been demonstrated only in four phylogenetically very distant species, including P. punctata. Despite its advantages, severe costs and constraints may have restricted its rapid evolution and persistence over time. The mechanisms of thelytokous parthenogenesis and its ecological correlates are reviewed for the known cases in the Hymenoptera. Investigating the occurrence of sexual reproduction in asexual lineages indicates that thelytokous parthenogenesis may not be irreversible. In P. punctata the occasional production of sexuals in some of the colonies may provide opportunity for outbreeding and genetic recombination. Thelytoky can thus function as a conditional reproductive strategy. Thelytoky in P. punctata possibly evolved as an adaptation to the risk of colony orphanage or the foundation of new colonies by fission. The current adaptive value of physical aggression and the production of sexuals in clonal populations, where relatedness asymmetries are virtually absent, however is less clear. Quite contrary, thelytoky could thereby serve as the stepping stone for the subsequent loss of the queen caste in P. punctata. Although P. punctata clearly fulfills all three conditions of eusociality, the evolution of thelytoky is interpreted as a first step in a secondary reverse social evolution towards a social system more primitive than eusociality.show moreshow less
  • Hoch eusoziale Insektenstaaten, einschließlich aller bekannten Ameisenarten, sind durch eine reproduktive Arbeitsteilung zwischen Königinnen, die begattet und reproduktiv aktiv sind, und Arbeiterinnen, die die Aufgaben des Fouragierens, der Nestkonstruktion und der Brutpflege übernehmen, gekennzeichnet. In den meisten Arten bleiben den Arbeiterinnen wenig reproduktive Optionen: Normalerweise zeugen sie haploide Männchen mittels arrhenotoker Parthenogenese, sowohl in königinnenlosen als auch in Kolonien mit Königinnen. In derHoch eusoziale Insektenstaaten, einschließlich aller bekannten Ameisenarten, sind durch eine reproduktive Arbeitsteilung zwischen Königinnen, die begattet und reproduktiv aktiv sind, und Arbeiterinnen, die die Aufgaben des Fouragierens, der Nestkonstruktion und der Brutpflege übernehmen, gekennzeichnet. In den meisten Arten bleiben den Arbeiterinnen wenig reproduktive Optionen: Normalerweise zeugen sie haploide Männchen mittels arrhenotoker Parthenogenese, sowohl in königinnenlosen als auch in Kolonien mit Königinnen. In der phylogenetisch ursprünglichen Unterfamilie Ponerinae ist der Dimorphismus der reproduktiven Kasten weniger ausgeprägt: Die Morphologie der Ovarien von Königinnen und Arbeiterinnen, die noch über eine Spermatheka verfügen, ist vergleichsweise ähnlich. In vielen Arten der Ponerinen paaren sich die Arbeiterinnen und haben die Königin-Kaste komplett ersetzt. Die Ähnlichkeit im reproduktiven Potential ermöglichte die Evolution diverser reproduktiver Systeme. Zusätzlich erhöhte sie die Wahrscheinlichkeit für das Auftreten von reproduktiven Konflikten erheblich. Nur in wenigen Ameisenarten, Platythyrea punctata eingeschlossen, sind Arbeiterinnen zusätzlich in der Lage, aus unbefruchteten haploiden Eiern durch thelytoke Parthenogenese diploide weibliche Nachkommen zu produzieren. Die ponerine Ameise P. punctata (Smith) ist der einzige Vertreter der Gattung in den Neotropen, der bis in den Süden der USA verbreitet ist. Der Verbreitungsschwerpunkt liegt in Zentralamerika und dem karibischen Raum. P. punctata kommt in einer Vielzahl von Habitaten, die von subtropischen Hartholz-Wälder bis zu tropischen Regenwäldern reichen, vor. Zusätzlich zu Königinnen kommen sowohl Gamergaten als auch thelytoke Arbeiterinnen in der selben Art vor. Diese bemerkenswerte Komplexität von reproduktiven Systemen macht P. punctata innerhalb der Ameisen einzigartig und bietet ein ideales Modellsystem zum Studium von reproduktiven Konflikten innerhalb der weiblichen Kaste. Die Kolonien nisten für gewöhnlich in verrottenden Ästen auf dem Waldboden, siedeln wahrscheinlich aber auch in höheren Straten der Vegetation. Die Kolonien enthalten im Durchschnitt 60 Arbeiterinnen, die maximale Koloniegröße beträgt 148 Arbeiterinnen. Königinnen wurden in zehn Prozent der in Florida gesammelten Kolonien gefunden, fehlten jedoch völlig in den auf Barbados und Puerto Rico untersuchten Populationen. Männchen waren generell selten. Zusätzlich wurden in 16 Kolonien, die alle in Florida gesammelt wurden, sogenannte Interkasten, also morphologisch zwischen Königinnen und Arbeiterinnen intermediäre Tiere, gefunden. Die Morphologie des Thorax variierte von einer arbeiterinnenähnlichen bis zu einer fast königinnenähnlichen Struktur. Die Größe von Königinnen und von Interkasten unterschied sich jedoch nicht von der von Arbeiterinnen. Obwohl bei Arbeiterinnen, die aus direkt im Feld gesammelten Kolonien entnommen wurden, aggressive Interaktionen beobachtet wurden, lies diese Nestgenossinnenerkennung im Labor nach. Merkmale, die der Erkennung dienen, sind daher wahrscheinlich aus der Umwelt abgeleitet. Nur eine der sechs sezierten Königinnen war begattet, jedoch nicht reproduktiv tätig. Stattdessen monopolisierte in den meisten königinnenlosen Kolonien eine einzige, nicht-begattete Arbeiterin die Reproduktion mittels thelytoker Parthenogenese. Eine einzige begattete und reproduktiv aktive Arbeiterin (eine Gamergate) wurde in einer der Kolonien aus Florida, die außerdem eine begattete, geflügelte Königin enthielt, gefunden. Die Regulation der Reproduktion wurde im Detail in zehn experimentellen Gruppen, die aus im Labor geschlüpften, virginen Arbeiterinnen bestanden, untersucht. In diesen dominierte eine Arbeiterin in der Regel die Reproduktion durch Thelytokie, obwohl mehrere Arbeiterinnen elongierte, sich entwickelnde Ovarien besaßen. In jeder Gruppe legte nur eine Arbeiterin Eier. Konflikte um die Reproduktion waren intensiv und bestanden aus ritualisierter, physischer Aggression, wie heftigem Antennieren, Beißen, Zehren, Vorschnellen und Immobilisierung, zwischen einigen Nestgenossinnen. Die durchschnittliche Frequenz dieser Interaktionen war niedrig. Die aggressiven Interaktionen erlaubten die Konstruktion von nichtlinearen sozialen Rang-Matrizen. Im Durchschnitt waren nur fünf Arbeiterinnen für 90 Prozent der gesamten agonistischen Interaktionen verantwortlich. In 80 Prozent der Gruppen erhöhte sich die Rate agonistischer Interaktionen nach der experimentellen Entfernung der reproduktiven Arbeiterin. Während heftiges Antennieren und Beißen sowohl vor als auch nach der Entfernung die häufigsten Formen agonistischer Verhaltensweisen waren, erhöhte sich die Rate von Beißen und Zehren signifikant nach der Entfernung. Dies ist ein Anzeichen dafür, dass die Intensität der agonistischen Interaktionen zunahm. Sobald eine Arbeiterin einen hohen sozialen Rank eingenommen hat, wird dieser ohne weitere aggressive Interaktionen beigehalten. Der Ersatz des reproduktiven Tieres durch eine andere Arbeiterin korreliert jedoch nicht mit deren vorherigem sozialen Status. Das Alter hatte jedoch einen bedeutenden Einfluss auf die individuelle Rate agonistischer Interaktionen, die Arbeiterinnen initiierten. Besonders junge Arbeiterinnen, nicht älter als zwei Monate, und "callows" waren für den, nach der Ablösung der alten, reproduktiven Arbeiterin beobachteten, Anstieg der Aggression verantwortlich. Diese Arbeiterinnen haben eine größere Chance, selbst reproduktiv zu werden, da ältere, fouragierende Arbeiterinnen ihre Ovarien eventuell nicht mehr entwickeln können. Die Aggressionen zwischen älteren Arbeiterinnen nahmen mit zunehmendem Alter ab. Arbeiterinnen, deren Ovarien sich bereits in Entwicklung befinden, stellen die größte Bedrohung für jedes reproduktive Tier dar. Die Sektion aller experimentellen Gruppen ergab, dass Aggression, verglichen mit Tieren mit resorbierten Ovarien, signifikant häufiger gegen Arbeiterinnen gerichtet war, die unentwickelte oder sich bereits entwickelnde Ovarien besaßen. In allen Gruppen wurde die Reproduktion von callows oder jungen Arbeiterinnen, die nicht älter als vier Monate waren, übernommen. Das Alter hat daher eine größere Vorhersagekraft für die reproduktive Dominanz als der soziale, durch physische Interaktionen regulierte, Status. Da zwischen genetisch identischen Nestgenossinen, unter der Vorherrschaft von Thelytokie, kein offener Konflikt zu erwarten ist, bleibt die Funktion von agonistischen Interaktionen in Nur-Arbeiterinnen-Kolonien von P. punctata unklar. Alternativ könnte physische Aggression auch zur Schaffung einer reibungslosen nicht-reproduktiven Arbeitsteilung, und damit zur Erhöhung der Kolonieeffizienz, dienen. Asexuelle Fortpflanzung, im Vergleich zu sexueller Fortpflanzung, wird oft als evolutionäre Sackgasse gesehen, weil in parthenogenetischen Populationen genetische Rekombination limitiert oder nicht-existent ist. Mikrosatelliten-Marker wurden verwendet, um die Konsequenzen thelytoker Fortpflanzung für die genetische Populationsstruktur von vier natürlichen Populationen von P. punctata zu untersuchen. In der Analyse von 314 Arbeiterinnen aus 51 Kolonien wurde an allen Loci nur eine geringe intraspezifische Variabilität, sowohl nach der Anzahl der Allele als auch der beobachteten Heterozygozitäten, entdeckt. Überraschenderweise gab es innerhalb der Populationen fast keine genetischen Unterschiede. Die einzelnen Populationen wiesen eine klonale Struktur auf, in der alle Arbeiterinnen den selben Genotyp besaßen. Der geringe Grad an genotypischer Variabilität spiegelt die Vorherrschaft thelytoker Reproduktion bei P. punctata unter natürlichen Bedingungen wieder. Zusätzlich wurde die Spezifität von zehn, für P. punctata entwickelte, Dinukleotid-Mikrosatelliten in 29 Ameisenarten aus vier verschiedenen Unterfamilien durch Kreuzamplifikation untersucht. Positive Amplifikation ergab sich nur in wenigen Arten. Selbst innerhalb derselben Gattung sind die, die hypervariablen Regionen flankierenden Sequenzen, nicht ausreichend konserviert, um Amplifikation zuzulassen. Der Karyotyp von P. punctata (2n = 84) ist eine der höchsten Chromosomenanzahlen, die bislang bei Ameisen bekannt sind. Eine erste Untersuchung ergab keine Hinweise auf Polyploidie, die oft mit der Entstehung von Parthenogenese verbunden ist. Thelytoke Parthenogenese ist innerhalb der Hymenopteren kein sehr häufiges Phänomen. Sie tritt nur verstreut auf und ist auf Taxa an den äußersten Verzweigungen der Stammbäume beschränkt. Innerhalb der Formicidae ist Thelytoky unwidersprüchlich nur in vier Arten, P. punctata eingeschlossen, beschrieben. Ungeachtet der Vorteile können evolutionäre Kosten und Zwänge die schnelle Evolution und zeitliche Persistenz von Thelytokie verhindern. Die Mechanismen thelytoker Parthenogenese und ihre ökologischen Hintergründe werden für die bisher bekannten Fälle innerhalb der Hymenopteren diskutiert. Das Auftreten von sexueller Reproduktion in asexuellen Linien deutet darauf hin, dass Thelytokie nicht irreversible ist. In P. punctata kann das gelegentliche Auftreten von Geschlechtstieren dazu dienen, Auszucht und genetische Rekombination zuzulassen. Thelytokie kann daher als eine konditionelle reproduktive Strategie verstanden werden. Thelytoke Fortpflanzung bei P. punctata evolvierte möglicherweise als eine Anpassung an ein hohes Risiko des Verlustes der Königin oder als Anpassung an die Verbreitung durch Koloniespaltung. Der derzeitige adaptive Wert physischer Aggression und der Geschlechtstierproduktion in klonalen Populationen, die praktisch keine Verwandtschaftsasymmetrien aufweisen, ist dagegen weniger klar. Ganz im Gegenteil, Thelytokie kann als weiterer Schritt auf dem Weg zum entgültigen Verlust der Königinnen Kaste bei P. punctata dienen. Obwohl P. punctata alle drei Kriterien für Eusozialität erfüllt, wird die Evolution von thelytoker Parthenogenese als erster Schritt in einer sekundären, reversen sozialen Evolution hin zu einem einfacheren sozialen System, als es Eusozialität darstellt, interpretiert.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Klaus Schilder
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-1977
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Fakultät für Biologie
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Date of final exam:2000/03/01
Language:English
Year of Completion:1999
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
GND Keyword:Ameisenstaat; Demökologie; Jungfernzeugung
Tag:Evolution; Interkasten; Koloniestruktur; Mikrosatelliten; Populationsgenetik; Thelytokie; reproduktive Konkurrenz; soziale Insekten
colony structur; evolution; intercastes; microsatellites; population genetics; reproductive competition; social insects; thelytoky
Release Date:2002/08/21
Advisor:Prof. Dr. Bert Hölldobler