Green classroom at the wildlife park: Aspects of environmental, instructional and conceptual education of primary school children concerning the European wildcat.

Das Grüne Klassenzimmer im Wildpark: Aspekte der Umweltbildung, Instruktion sowie Schülervorstellungen bei Grundschulkindern zum Thema Wildkatze.

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-169496
  • To foster sustainable environmentally friendly behavior in children it is important to provide an effective form of environmental education. In this context we studied three important factors: Attitude towards nature, environmental knowledge and advanced expert knowledge. Concerning attitude towards nature our first question was: “Is it possible to affect primary school children’s environmental values during a one-day visit at a wildlife park?” As a control, the program was also conducted in schools, leading to two different learningTo foster sustainable environmentally friendly behavior in children it is important to provide an effective form of environmental education. In this context we studied three important factors: Attitude towards nature, environmental knowledge and advanced expert knowledge. Concerning attitude towards nature our first question was: “Is it possible to affect primary school children’s environmental values during a one-day visit at a wildlife park?” As a control, the program was also conducted in schools, leading to two different learning settings- wildlife park and school. Regarding environmental knowledge, in our second question we wanted to know, if our modified teaching approach “guided learning at workstations” (G) combining instructional and constructivist elements would lead to good cognitive learning results of primary school children. Additionally, we compared it to a stronger teacher-centered (T) as well as to a stronger student-centered (S) approach. The third question we asked was “Is it possible to convey fascinating expert knowledge on a more advanced subject to primary school children using conceptual change theory?” After gathering primary school children’s preconceptions, we defined different groups due to the heterogeneity of their pre-existing conceptions and the change in conceptions. Based on this research we designed a program along with an instrument to measure the impact of the conceptual change teaching method. After years of building a strong cooperation between the section Didactics of Biology at the Julius-Maximilians University Würzburg, the nearby schools and the wildlife park “Wild-Park Klaushof” near Bad Kissingen in northern Bavaria it was time to evaluate the environmental education programs prepared and applied by undergraduate university students. As a model species we chose the European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) which represents endangered wildlife in Europe and the need for human interaction for the sake of preserving a species by restoring or recreating the habitat conditions needed while maintaining current infrastructure. Drawing from our own as well as teachers’ and university students’ experiences, we built, implemented and evaluated a hands-on program following several workstations between the wildcat enclosure and the wildlife park’s green classroom. The content of our intervention was presented as a problem-oriented lesson, where children were confronted with the need for human interaction in order to preserve the European wildcat. Not only on a theoretical basis, but very specific to their hometowns they were told where and when nature conservation groups met or where to donate money. 692 Bavarian third grade primary school children in 35 classes participated in the one-day intervention that took place between the months of april, 2014 and november, 2015 in the wildlife park or in their respective classrooms. The ages varied between 8 and 11 years with the mean age being 8.88 ± 0.56 years old. 48.6 % of them were boys, 51.4 % were girls. (1) To measure primary school children’s environmental attitudes a questionnaire on two major environmental values- preservation and utilization of nature- was administered in a pre, post- and retention test design. It was possible to affect primary school children’s environmental preservation values during our one-day program. This result could be found not only at the wildlife park but unexpectedly also in school, where we educated classes for control purposes. We also found this impact consistent in all used teaching approaches and were surprised to see the preservation values change in a way we did not expect from higher tendency towards preservation of nature to a lower one. We presume that children of this age group reflected on the contents of our intervention. This had an influence on their own values towards preservation which led to a more realistic marking behavior in the questionnaire. We therefore conclude that it is possible to affect primary school children’s environmental values with a one-day program on environmental content. (2) We were interested in conveying environmental knowledge about the European wildcat; its morphology, ecology and behavior. We designed and applied a knowledge questionnaire also in a pre-, post- and retention test design, to find out, whether different forms of instruction made a difference in learning success of primary school children. We used two approaches with a teacher in the role of a didactic leader- our modified guided approach (G) as well as a stronger teacher-centered one (T) with a higher focus on instruction. The third approach was presented as a strong student-centered learning at workstations (S) without a didactic leader we also called “free learning at workstations”. Overall, all children’s knowledge scores changed significantly from pre- to post-test and from pre- to retention test, indicating learning success. Differences could only be found between the posttest values of both approaches with a didactic leader (G, T) in comparison to the strong student-centered (S) form. It appears that these primary school children gained knowledge at the out of school learning setting regardless of the used teaching approach. On the subject of short-term differences, we discuss, that the difference in learning success might have been consistent from post to retention test if a consolidation phase had been added in the days following the program as should be common practice after a visit to an out-of- school learning setting but was not part of our intervention. When comparing both approaches with a didactic leader (G, T), we prefer our modified guided learning at workstations (G) since constructivist phases can be implemented without losses concerning learning success. Moreover, the (at least temporary) presence of a teacher in the role of a didactic leader ensures maintained discipline and counteracts off-task behavior. To make sure, different emotional states did not factor in our program, we measured children’s situational emotions directly after the morning intervention using a short scale that evaluated interest, wellbeing and boredom. We found, that these emotions remained consistent over both learning settings as well as different forms of instruction. While interest and wellbeing remained constantly high, boredom values remained low. We take this as a sign of high quality designing and conducting the intervention. (3) In the afternoon of the one-day intervention, children were given the opportunity to investigate the wildcat further, this time using the conceptual change theory in combination with a more complex and fascinating content: cats’ vision in dusk and dawn. Children were confronted with their preconceptions which had been sampled prior to the study and turned into three distinctive topics reflected in a special questionnaire. In a pre-, post and retention test design we included the most common alternative conceptions, the scientifically correct conceptions as well as other preconceptions. We gathered a high heterogeneity of preconceptions and defined three groups based on conceptual change literature: “Conceptual change”, “Synthetic Models” and “Conceptual Growth”. In addition to these we identified two more groups after our data analysis: “Knowledge” and “Non-addressed Concepts”. We found that instruction according to the conceptual change theory did not work with primary school children in our intervention. The conceptual change from the addressed alternative conceptions as well as from other preconceptions towards the scientifically correct conceptions was successfully achieved only on occasion. In our case and depending on the topic only one third to one fourth of the children actually held the addressed conception while the rest was not targeted by the instruction. Moreover, we conclude children holding other conceptions were rather confused than educated by the confrontation. We assume that children of this age group may be overchallenged by the conceptual change method.show moreshow less
  • Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung soll unter anderem dazu führen, dass Kinder langfristig umweltfreundliches Verhalten zeigen. Um dies zu erreichen, sind verschiedene Faktoren nötig - in dieser Studie lag unser besonderes Augenmerk auf drei Punkten: den Umwelteinstellungen der Kinder, dem umweltrelevanten Wissen, besonders im Hinblick auf die Lebensbedingungen und den Schutz der europäischen Wildkatze sowie weiterführendem, komplexeren, biologischen Wissen. Zuerst fragten wir uns in Bezug auf die Umwelteinstellungen, ob es möglich ist, dieBildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung soll unter anderem dazu führen, dass Kinder langfristig umweltfreundliches Verhalten zeigen. Um dies zu erreichen, sind verschiedene Faktoren nötig - in dieser Studie lag unser besonderes Augenmerk auf drei Punkten: den Umwelteinstellungen der Kinder, dem umweltrelevanten Wissen, besonders im Hinblick auf die Lebensbedingungen und den Schutz der europäischen Wildkatze sowie weiterführendem, komplexeren, biologischen Wissen. Zuerst fragten wir uns in Bezug auf die Umwelteinstellungen, ob es möglich ist, die Einstellungen der Grundschulkinder zum Thema „Erhaltung der Natur“ im Laufe nur eines Tages am Wildpark zu beeinflussen. Umweltwissen war der Bestandteil der zweiten Frage, wie Grundschulkinder am außerschulischen Lernort gute Lernerfolge erzielen können. Wir testeten unseren modifizierten Ansatz „Geführtes Lernen an Stationen“ (G), der instruktionale und konstruktivistische Elemente beinhaltet und verglichen ihn einerseits mit einem stärker lehrerzentrierten (T) sowie andererseits einem stark schülerzentrierten (S) Lernen an Stationen, das wir auch als „freies Lernen an Stationen“ bezeichneten. Die dritte Frage beschäftigte sich schließlich damit, ob es gelingen kann, faszinierendes, tiefergehendes Wissen mit Hilfe der „Conceptual Change Theorie“ an Grundschulkinder zu vermitteln. Hintergrund der didaktischen Arbeit mit Grundschülern am außerschulischen Lernort Wildpark ist die Kooperation zwischen der Fachgruppe Didaktik der Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg mit dem „Wild-Park Klaushof“ bei Bad Kissingen. Im Rahmen dieser Zusammenarbeit stellt die Fachgruppe Didaktik Biologie angehende Biologielehrerinnen und -lehrer als Referenten von Führungen gemäß des „Geführten Lernen an Stationen“ zur Verfügung. Diese Führungen wurden inhaltlich und didaktisch ebenfalls von Lehramtsstudierenden in der Biologiedidaktik ausgearbeitet, meist im Rahmen der schriftlichen Hausarbeiten gegen Ende des Lehramtsstudiums. Die Führungen sind konstruktivistisch angelegt, bieten hohe Selbsttätigkeit der Schülerinnen und Schüler und folgen dem Prinzip des problemorientierten Unterrichts. Die Schülerinnen und Schüler arbeiten nicht völlig frei, es handelt sich aber auch nicht um einen rein lehrerzentrierten Vortrag, sondern eine Mischung aus beiden Formen, die wir als „Geführtes Lernen an Stationen“ (G) bezeichnen. In dieser Variante stellt der Referent die didaktische Leitung der Führung dar, der Impulse und Anleitungen gibt, immer für Fragen zur Verfügung steht, jedoch Anteile von Selbsttätigkeit ermuntert und begleitet. Im Zeitraum von April 2014 bis November 2015 nahmen 692 Grundschulkinder der dritten Klassen bayerischer Grundschulen in 35 Klassen an der Studie am Wild-Park Klaushof sowie in ihren eigenen Klassenzimmern in der Schule teil. Durchschnittlich waren die Kinder 8.88 ± 0.56 Jahre alt, das Alter variierte zwischen 8 und 11 Jahren. 48,6 % der teilnehmenden Kinder waren Jungs, 51,4 % Mädchen. Im Vormittagsteil des Programms wurde im Rahmen einer problemorientierten Unterrichtseinheit gemeinsam mit den Schülerinnen und Schülern die Frage aufgeworfen, warum die europäische Wildkatze (Felis silvestris silvestris), eine Zeigerart für intakte Ökosysteme, nicht überall vorkommt, wo sie vorkommen könnte. Gemeinsam wurden Aspekte zu Morphologie, Ökologie und Verhalten der Wildkatze erarbeitet; die Frage konnte jedoch auch dann noch nicht beantwortet werden. Erst eine Verknüpfung der Verbreitungskarten und der gelernten Fakten führte zur Erkenntnis, dass die Wildkatze bestimmte Barrieren (Autobahnen, offene Wiesen- und Ackerflächen, bebaute Flächen etc.) nicht überwinden kann und hier der Eingriff des Menschen nötig ist. Nicht nur allgemein, sondern auch ganz konkret wurde der eigene Einsatz der Kinder, zum Beispiel im Rahmen der Mitarbeit in einer Naturschutz-Organisation oder einer Geldspende angeregt. (1) Zur Messung der Umwelteinstellungen verwendeten wir das 2-MEV Modell (two major environmental factors), das die Umwelteinstellungen in zwei Dimensionen darstellt, zum einen die Tendenz zur Erhaltung, zum anderen die Ausnutzungstendenz der Umwelt. Die Fragebögen wurden zu drei Testzeitpunkten ausgefüllt - einem Vortest ca. eine Woche vor dem Programm, einem Nachtest unmittelbar nach Beendigung des Programms und einem Behaltenstest etwa sechs bis acht Wochen nach dem Programm. Die Umwelt-Einstellungen konnten tatsächlich verändert werden, nicht nur am Wildpark, sondern auch in der Schule, wo Klassen das Programm zu Kontrollzwecken ebenfalls durchliefen. Auch blieb der Einfluss über alle verwendeten Lehrmethoden konsistent. Besonders überrascht waren wir von der Art der Änderung der Einstellungen zur Naturerhaltung. Statt sich wie erwartet von schwächerer Tendenz zur Erhaltung in Richtung stärkere Tendenz zur Naturerhaltung zu ändern, erfolgte die Änderung genau entgegengesetzt. Wir vermuten, dass die Kinder dieser Altersgruppe die Inhalte der Intervention reflektiert haben und dies einen Einfluss auf ihre Einstellungen zur Naturerhaltung hatte, was sich in einem realistischeren Ankreuzverhalten niederschlug. Zusammenfassend sehen wir es als möglich an, die Einstellungen zur Umwelt von Grundschulkindern mit einem Ein-Tagesprogramm zu verändern. (2) Auch für die Erhebung des Umweltwissens wählten wir die bereits erwähnten drei Testzeitpunkte für den Wissensfragebogen, der Fragen zur Morphologie, Ökologie und Verhalten der Wildkatze beinhaltete. Die Anzahl richtiger Antworten erhöhte sich vom Vor- zum Nachtest sowie vom Vor- zum Behaltenstest signifikant bei allen Schülerinnen und Schülern, es wurde also erfolgreich gelernt. Zwischen den einzelnen Führungsformen konnten wir signifikante Unterschiede nur kurzfristig vom Vor- zum Nachtest zwischen den beiden Methoden mit dem didaktischen Begleiter, also dem stärker lehrerzentrierten (T) und dem „Geführten Lernen an Stationen“ (G) einerseits und dem stark schülerzentrierten freien Lernen (S) andererseits erkennen. Der kurzfristige Wissenserwerb war mit didaktischem Begleiter (G, T) höher als ohne. Insgesamt konnte also ein Lernerfolg verzeichnet werden, unabhängig von der Führungsform. Allerdings vermuten wir, dass der kurzfristige Unterschied sich auch mittelfristig ausgewirkt hätte, wenn im Anschluss an den Besuch im Wildpark eine Nachbereitung stattgefunden hätte, was gewöhnlich zum Besuch des außerschulischen Lernorts gehören sollte, jedoch nicht Bestandteil dieser Untersuchung war. Vergleicht man die beiden Ansätze mit didaktischen Begleitern (G, T), bevorzugen wir nach wie vor unser „Geführtes Lernen an Stationen“ (G), da hier die Einbindung konstruktivistischer Phasen möglich ist. Darüber hinaus kann die (zumindest zeitweise) Anwesenheit eines Lehrers in der Rolle des didaktischen Begleiters sicherstellen, dass Disziplin gewahrt wird und Störungen vermieden werden. Um die situationalen Emotionen der Schülerinnen und Schüler mit einbeziehen zu können, beziehungsweise Effekte von situationalen Emotionen auf Umwelteinstellungen oder Wissenserwerb ausschließen zu können, wendeten wir zusätzlich eine Kurzskala zur Erfassung von Interesse, Langeweile und Wohlbefinden an. Diese Skala wurde nur einmalig angewendet, direkt im Anschluss an das Vormittagsprogramm. Wir konnten keine Unterschiede bei den erhobenen situationalen Emotionen finden - weder zwischen den Lernorten Schule und Wildpark noch zwischen den drei verschiedenen Führungsformen (G, T, S), überall zeigten sich hohe Werte für Interesse und Wohlbefinden sowie niedrige Werte für Langeweile. Dieses Ergebnis zeigt für uns die hohe didaktische Qualität der Entwicklung und Durchführung des Programms. (3) Am Nachmittag des Ein-Tages-Programms beschäftigten sich die Kinder weiter mit der Wildkatze, diesmal folgten wir einer anderen Methode der Wissensvermittlung, der „Conceptual Change Theorie“ in Kombination mit komplexerem und gleichzeitig faszinierendem Wissen zum Dämmerungssehen der Katze. Gemäß dem Prinzip der didaktischen Rekonstruktion wurden Wissensinhalte im Rahmen dieser Intervention nicht kontinuierlich erarbeitet wie im Vormittagsprogramm, sondern es fand eine Konfrontation der Schülerinnen und Schüler mit ihren eigenen Schülervorstellungen zum Thema Dämmerungssehen bei Mensch und Katze statt. Diese Vorstellungen wurden vorab in einem offenen Fragebogen erhoben und in drei Themenschwerpunkte gegliedert, die sich anschließend im Fragebogen zur Erhebung des Konzeptwechsels widerspiegelten. Auch dieser Fragebogen wurde zu den eingangs erwähnten drei Testzeitpunkten angewendet. Gemäß der Theorie erwarteten wir im Ankreuzverhalten drei Gruppen: „Conceptual Change“, „Synthetic Models“ sowie „Conceptual Growth“. Darüber hinaus fanden wir zwei weitere Gruppen „Knowledge“ und „Non-addressed Concepts“. Wir stellten fest, dass der Konzeptwechsel der Kinder von der wissenschaftlich nicht korrekten Schülervorstellung hin zur wissenschaftlich korrekten Vorstellung in unserer Intervention nicht gelang, nur punktuell kreuzten wenige Schülerinnen und Schüler das entsprechende Muster an. Auch der Wechsel in den anderen Gruppen hin zur wissenschaftlich korrekten Vorstellung funktionierte kaum. In unserem Fall hatten darüber hinaus je nach Thema nur ein Drittel bis ein Viertel der beteiligten Kinder überhaupt die adressierte Vorstellung, was unserer Meinung nach dazu führt, dass der Großteil der Kinder mit anderen Vorstellungen durch die Anwendung der „Conceptual Change Theorie“ eher verwirrt wurde. Wir vermuten, dass Grundschulkinder der dritten Klasse durch diese Form des Unterrichts überfordert sind.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Sabine Glaab
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-169496
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Fakultät für Biologie
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Referee:Dr. Thomas Heyne, Prof. Dr. Franz Xaver Bogner
Date of final exam:2018/10/12
Language:English
Year of Completion:2020
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25972/OPUS-16949
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 59 Tiere (Zoologie) / 590 Tiere (Zoologie)
GND Keyword:Biologie
Tag:Education
Release Date:2020/10/12
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-SA: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 4.0 International