Ureaplasma species modulate cytokine and chemokine responses in human brain microvascular endothelial cells

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-201848
  • Ureaplasma species are common colonizers of the adult genitourinary tract and often considered as low-virulence commensals. Intraamniotic Ureaplasma infections, however, facilitate chorioamnionitis and preterm birth, and cases of Ureaplasma-induced neonatal sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis raise a growing awareness of their clinical relevance. In vitro studies are scarce but demonstrate distinct Ureaplasma-driven impacts on immune mechanisms. The current study addressed cytokine and chemokine responses upon exposure of native orUreaplasma species are common colonizers of the adult genitourinary tract and often considered as low-virulence commensals. Intraamniotic Ureaplasma infections, however, facilitate chorioamnionitis and preterm birth, and cases of Ureaplasma-induced neonatal sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis raise a growing awareness of their clinical relevance. In vitro studies are scarce but demonstrate distinct Ureaplasma-driven impacts on immune mechanisms. The current study addressed cytokine and chemokine responses upon exposure of native or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) co-stimulated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to Ureaplasma urealyticum or U. parvum, using qRT-PCR, RNA sequencing, multi-analyte immunoassay, and flow cytometry. Ureaplasma exposure in native HBMEC reduced monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3 mRNA expression (p < 0.01, vs. broth). In co-stimulated HBMEC, Ureaplasma spp. attenuated LPS-evoked mRNA responses for C-X-C chemokine ligand 5, MCP-1, and MCP-3 (p < 0.05, vs. LPS) and mitigated LPS-driven interleukin (IL)-1α protein secretion, as well as IL-8 mRNA and protein responses (p < 0.05). Furthermore, Ureaplasma isolates increased C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 mRNA levels in native and LPS co-stimulated HBMEC (p < 0.05). The presented results may imply immunomodulatory capacities of Ureaplasma spp. which may ultimately promote chronic colonization and long-term neuroinflammation.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Christine Silwedel, Christian P. Speer, Axel Haarmann, Markus Fehrholz, Heike Claus, Nicolas Schlegel, Kirsten Glaser
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-201848
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Klinik und Poliklinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral-, Gefäß- und Kinderchirurgie (Chirurgische Klinik I)
Medizinische Fakultät / Kinderklinik und Poliklinik
Medizinische Fakultät / Institut für Hygiene und Mikrobiologie
Medizinische Fakultät / Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik
Language:English
Parent Title (English):International Journal of Molecular Science
Year of Completion:2019
Volume:20
Issue:14
Pagenumber:3583
Source:International Journal of Molecular Science 2019, 20(14), 3583; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20143583
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20143583
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Tag:HBMEC; Ureaplasma parvum; Ureaplasma urealyticum; blood–brain barrier; meningitis; neuroinflammation
Release Date:2020/03/26
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung 4.0 International