Organoid Models for Cancer Research — From Bed to Bench Side and Back

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-246307
  • Simple Summary Despite significant strides in multimodal therapy, cancers still rank within the first three causes of death especially in industrial nations. A lack of individualized approaches and accurate preclinical models are amongst the major barriers that limit the development of novel therapeutic options and drugs. Recently, the 3D culture system of organoids was developed which stably retains the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the original tissue, healthy as well as diseased. In this review, we summarize current data andSimple Summary Despite significant strides in multimodal therapy, cancers still rank within the first three causes of death especially in industrial nations. A lack of individualized approaches and accurate preclinical models are amongst the major barriers that limit the development of novel therapeutic options and drugs. Recently, the 3D culture system of organoids was developed which stably retains the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the original tissue, healthy as well as diseased. In this review, we summarize current data and evidence on the relevance and reliability of such organoid culture systems in cancer research, focusing on their role in drug investigations (in a personalized manner). Abstract Organoids are a new 3D ex vivo culture system that have been applied in various fields of biomedical research. First isolated from the murine small intestine, they have since been established from a wide range of organs and tissues, both in healthy and diseased states. Organoids genetically, functionally and phenotypically retain the characteristics of their tissue of origin even after multiple passages, making them a valuable tool in studying various physiologic and pathophysiologic processes. The finding that organoids can also be established from tumor tissue or can be engineered to recapitulate tumor tissue has dramatically increased their use in cancer research. In this review, we discuss the potential of organoids to close the gap between preclinical in vitro and in vivo models as well as clinical trials in cancer research focusing on drug investigation and development.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Carolin Kastner, Anne Hendricks, Hanna Deinlein, Mohammed Hankir, Christoph-Thomas Germer, Stefanie Schmidt, Armin Wiegering
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-246307
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Klinik und Poliklinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral-, Gefäß- und Kinderchirurgie (Chirurgische Klinik I)
Medizinische Fakultät / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Cancers
ISSN:2072-6694
Year of Completion:2021
Volume:13
Issue:19
Article Number:4812
Source:Cancers 2021, 13(19), 4812; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13194812
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13194812
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 617 Chirurgie und verwandte medizinische Fachrichtungen
Tag:cancer; organoid; patient-derived organoid (PDOs); patient-derived tumor organoid (PDTO); tumor disease
Release Date:2022/01/11
Date of first Publication:2021/09/26
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung 4.0 International