Spatial tuning of translational optic flow responses in hawkmoths of varying body size

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-266565
  • To safely navigate their environment, flying insects rely on visual cues, such as optic flow. Which cues insects can extract from their environment depends closely on the spatial and temporal response properties of their visual system. These in turn can vary between individuals that differ in body size. How optic flow-based flight control depends on the spatial structure of visual cues, and how this relationship scales with body size, has previously been investigated in insects with apposition compound eyes. Here, we characterised the visualTo safely navigate their environment, flying insects rely on visual cues, such as optic flow. Which cues insects can extract from their environment depends closely on the spatial and temporal response properties of their visual system. These in turn can vary between individuals that differ in body size. How optic flow-based flight control depends on the spatial structure of visual cues, and how this relationship scales with body size, has previously been investigated in insects with apposition compound eyes. Here, we characterised the visual flight control response limits and their relationship to body size in an insect with superposition compound eyes: the hummingbird hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum. We used the hawkmoths' centring response in a flight tunnel as a readout for their reception of translational optic flow stimuli of different spatial frequencies. We show that their responses cut off at different spatial frequencies when translational optic flow was presented on either one, or both tunnel walls. Combined with differences in flight speed, this suggests that their flight control was primarily limited by their temporal rather than spatial resolution. We also observed strong individual differences in flight performance, but no correlation between the spatial response cutoffs and body or eye size.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Rebecca Grittner, Emily Baird, Anna Stöckl
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-266565
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Journal of Comparative Physiology A
ISSN:1432-1351
Year of Completion:2022
Volume:208
Issue:2
Pagenumber:279–296
Source:Journal of Comparative Physiology A 2022, 208(2):279–296. DOI: 10.1007/s00359-021-01530-1
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00359-021-01530-1
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=34893928
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Tag:allometry; flight control; hawkmoth; optic flow; vision
Release Date:2022/08/03
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung 4.0 International