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In situ guided tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal diseases and aging

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-124738
  • In situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide “minimal invasive” applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and differentiation factors and scaffolds, must probablyIn situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide “minimal invasive” applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and differentiation factors and scaffolds, must probably be deemed unrealistic for economic and regulation-related issues. Hence, the progress made in this respect will be mostly applicable to a fraction of post-traumatic or post-surgery situations such as big tissue defects due to tumor manifestation. Minimally invasive procedures would probably qualify for a broader application and ideally would only require off the shelf standardized products without cells. Such products should mimic the microenvironment of regenerating tissues and make use of the endogenous tissue regeneration capacities. Functionally, the chemotaxis of regenerative cells, their amplification as a transient amplifying pool and their concerted differentiation and remodeling should be addressed. This is especially important because the main target populations for such applications are the elderly and diseased. The quality of regenerative cells is impaired in such organisms and high levels of inhibitors also interfere with regeneration and healing. In metabolic bone diseases like osteoporosis, it is already known that antagonists for inhibitors such as activin and sclerostin enhance bone formation. Implementing such strategies into applications for in situ guided tissue regeneration should greatly enhance the efficacy of tailored procedures in the future.show moreshow less

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Author: Franz Jakob, Regina Ebert, Maximilian Rudert, Ulrich Nöth, Heike Walles, Denitsa Docheva, Matthias Schieker, Lorenz Meinel, Jürgen Groll
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-124738
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Lehrstuhl für Orthopädie
Medizinische Fakultät / Lehrstuhl für Tissue Engineering und Regenerative Medizin
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Cell and Tissue Research
Year of Completion:2012
Volume:347
Issue:3
Pagenumber:725-735
Source:Cell Tissue Research (2012) 347:725–735. DOI 10.1007/s00441-011-1237-z
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00441-011-1237-z
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 616 Krankheiten
Tag:in situ guided tissue regeneration; mesenchymal tissues; regenerative medicine; scaffolds; stem cells
Release Date:2016/01/22
EU-Project number / Contract (GA) number:241719
OpenAIRE:OpenAIRE
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-NC: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Nicht kommerziell