• search hit 4 of 8
Back to Result List

Color vision and retinal development of the compound eye in bees

Farbensehen und retinale Entwicklung des Komplexauges bei Bienen

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-150997
  • The superfamiliy of bees, Apiformes, comprises more than 20,000 species. Within the group, the eusocial species like honeybees and bumblebees are receiving increased attention due to their outstanding importance for pollination of many crop and wild plants, their exceptional eusocial lifestyle and complex behavioral repertoire, which makes them an interesting invertebrate model to study mechanisms of sensory perception, learning and memory. In bees and most animals, vision is one of the major senses since almost every living organism and manyThe superfamiliy of bees, Apiformes, comprises more than 20,000 species. Within the group, the eusocial species like honeybees and bumblebees are receiving increased attention due to their outstanding importance for pollination of many crop and wild plants, their exceptional eusocial lifestyle and complex behavioral repertoire, which makes them an interesting invertebrate model to study mechanisms of sensory perception, learning and memory. In bees and most animals, vision is one of the major senses since almost every living organism and many biological processes depend on light energy. Bees show various forms of vision, e.g. color vision, achromatic vision or polarized vision in order to orientate in space, recognize mating partners, detect suitable nest sites and search for rewarding food sources. To catch photons and convert light energy into electric signals, bees possess compound eyes which consists of thousands of single ommatidia comprising a fixed number of photoreceptors; they are characterized by a specific opsin protein with distinct spectral sensitivity. Different visual demands, e.g. the detection of a single virgin queen by a drone, or the identification and discrimination of flowers during foraging bouts by workers, gave rise to the exceptional sex-specific morphology and physiology of male and female compound eyes in honeybees. Since Karl von Frisch first demonstrated color vision in honeybees more than 100 years ago, much effort has been devoted to gain insight into the molecular, morphological and physiological characteristics of (sex-specific) bee compound eyes and the corresponding photoreceptors. However, to date, almost nothing is known about the underlying mechanisms during pupal development which pattern the retina and give rise to the distinct photoreceptor distribution. Hence, in Chapter 2 and 3 I aimed to better understand the retinal development and photoreceptor determination in the honeybee eye. In a first step, the intrinsic temporal expression pattern of opsins within the retina was evaluated by quantifying opsin mRNA expression levels during the pupal phase of honeybee workers and drones. First results revealed that honeybee workers and drones express three different opsin genes, UVop, BLop and Lop1 during pupal development which give rise to an ultraviolet, blue, and green-light sensitive photoreceptor. Moreover, opsin expression patterns differed between both sexes and the onset of a particular opsin occurred at different time points during retinal development. Immunostainings of the developing honeybee retina in Chapter 2 showed that at the beginning of pupation the retina consist only of a thin hypodermis. However, at this stage all retinal structures are already present. From about mid of pupation, opsin expression levels increase and goes hand in hand with the differentiation of the rhabdoms, suggesting a two-step process in photoreceptor development and differentiation in the honeybee compound eye. In a first step the photoreceptor cells meet its fate during late pupation; in a second step, the quantity of opsin expression in each photoreceptor strongly increase up to the 25-fold shortly after eclosion. To date, the underlying mechanisms leading to different photoreceptor types have been intensively studied in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and to some extend in butterflies. Interestingly, the molecular mechanisms seemed to be conserved within insects and e.g. the two transcription factors, spalt and spineless, which have been shown to be essential for photoreceptor determination in flies and butterflies, have been also identified in the honeybee. In chapter 3, I investigated the expression patterns of both transcription factors during pupal development of honeybee workers and showed that spalt is mainly expressed during the first few pupal stages which might correlate with the onset of BLop expression. Further, spineless showed a prominent peak at mid of pupation which might initiates the expression of Lop1. However, whether spalt and spineless are also essential for photoreceptor determination in the honeybee has still to be investigated, e.g. by a knockdown/out of the respective transcription factor during retinal development which leads to a spectral phenotype, e.g. a dichromatic eye. Such spectral phenotypes can then be tested in behavioral experiments in order to test the function of specific photoreceptors for color perception and the entrainment of the circadian clock. In order to evaluate the color discrimination capabilities of bees and the quality of color perception, a reliable behavioral experiment under controlled conditions is a prerequisite. Hence, in chapter 4, I aimed to establish the visual PER paradigm as a suitable method for behaviorally testing color vision in bees. Since PER color vision has considered to be difficult in bees and was not successful in Western honeybees without ablating the bee’s antennae or presenting color stimuli in combination with other cues for several decades, the experimental setup was first established in bumblebees which have been shown to be robust and reliable, e.g. during electrophysiological recordings. Workers and drones of the bufftailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris were able to associate different monochromatic light stimuli with a sugar reward and succeeded in discriminating a rewarded color stimulus from an unrewarded color stimulus. They were also able to retrieve the learned stimulus after two hours, and workers successfully transferred the learned information to a new behavioral context. In the next step, the experimental setup was adapted to honeybees. In chapter 5, I tested the setup in two medium-sized honeybees, the Eastern honeybee, Apis cerana and the Western honeybee, Apis mellifera. Both honeybee species were able to associate and discriminate between two monochromatic light stimuli, blue and green light, with peak sensitivities of 435 nm and 528 nm. Eastern and Western honeybees also successfully retrieve the learned stimulus after two hours, similar to the bumblebees. Visual conditioning setups and training protocols in my study significantly differed from previous studies using PER conditioning. A crucial feature found to be important for a successful visual PER conditioning is the duration of the conditioned stimulus presentation. In chapter 6, I systematically tested different length of stimuli presentations, since visual PER conditioning in earlier studies tended to be only successful when the conditioned stimulus is presented for more than 10 seconds. In this thesis, intact honeybee workers could successfully discriminate two monochromatic lights when the stimulus was presented 10 s before reward was offered, but failed, when the duration of stimulus presentation was shorter than 4 s. In order to allow a more comparable conditioning, I developed a new setup which includes a shutter, driven by a PC based software program. The revised setup allows a more precise and automatized visual PER conditioning, facilitating performance levels comparable to olfactory conditioning and providing now an excellent method to evaluate visual perception and cognition of bees under constant and controlled conditions in future studies.show moreshow less
  • Die Bienen umfassen weltweit mehr als 20000 Arten, aber besonders eusoziale Honigbienen und Hummeln gewinnen durch ihre essenzielle Rolle bei der Bestäubung vieler Wild- und Kulturpflanzen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ihr einzigartiger eusozialer Lebensstil, aber auch ihr komplexes Verhaltensrepertoire macht sie zu einem interessanten Insektenmodel, um Mechanismen sensorischer Wahrnehmung, sowie Fähigkeiten des Lernens und Gedächtnisses näher zu untersuchen. Da beinahe jeder lebende Organismus und viele biologische Prozessen durch SonnenenergieDie Bienen umfassen weltweit mehr als 20000 Arten, aber besonders eusoziale Honigbienen und Hummeln gewinnen durch ihre essenzielle Rolle bei der Bestäubung vieler Wild- und Kulturpflanzen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ihr einzigartiger eusozialer Lebensstil, aber auch ihr komplexes Verhaltensrepertoire macht sie zu einem interessanten Insektenmodel, um Mechanismen sensorischer Wahrnehmung, sowie Fähigkeiten des Lernens und Gedächtnisses näher zu untersuchen. Da beinahe jeder lebende Organismus und viele biologische Prozessen durch Sonnenenergie beeinflusst werden, ist die Fähigkeit des Sehens im Tierreich weit verbreitet und zählt auch bei Bienen zu den wichtigsten sensorischen Sinnen. Um geeignete Nistplätze, Futterquellen oder auch Paarungsspartner zu finden, sowie zur Orientierung, nutzen Bienen verschiedenste Formen des Sehens, z. B. Farbensehen, achromatisches Sehen, oder auch das Polarisationssehen. Um Photonen einfangen und diese in ein elektrisches Signal für die weitere Verarbeitung umzuwandeln zu können, besitzen Bienen Komplexaugen, die sich aus mehreren tausend Einzelaugen, den sogeannten Ommatiden zusammensetzen. Jedes Ommatidium enthält eine festgelegte Anzahl an Photorezeptoren, welche durch ein spezifisches Opsin- Protein mit einer bestimmten spektralen Empfindlichkeit charakterisiert sind. Unterschiedliche visuelle Ansprüche wie zum Beispiel die Wahrnehmung einer einzelnen Königin während ihres Paarungsfluges durch einen Drohn oder die Identifizierung und Unterscheidung von Blüten während des Sammelflugs einer Arbeiterin, führten zu einer geschlechtsspezifischen Morphologie und Physiologie männlicher und weiblicher Komplexaugen. Seit Karl von Frisch vor mehr als 100 Jahren zeigen konnte, dass Honigbienen Farben wahrnehmen können, wurden viele Anstrengungen unternommen, ein besseres Verständnis für die molekularen und physiologischen Eigenschaften des (geschlechtsspezifischen) Bienenkomplexauges zu entwickeln. Dennoch ist bis heute wenig über die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen bekannt, die während der Puppenentwicklung der Biene zur Bildung der Retina und der spezifischen Verteilung der Photorezeptoren innerhalb der Retina führen. Daher wurde in Kapitel 2 dieser Thesis das Ziel verfolgt, die retinale Entwicklung sowie die Determinierung der Photorezeptoren im Honigbienenauge weiter aufzuschlüsseln. In einem ersten Schritt wurde das zeitliche Opsinexpressionsmuster während der Puppenentwicklung von Drohnen und Arbeiterinnen der Honigbiene durch Quantifizierung der Opsin-mRNA Expression, untersucht. Erste Ergebnisse zeigten, dass Drohnen und Arbeiterinnen während ihrer Puppenentwicklung drei verschiedene Opsin-Gene, UVop, BLop und Lop1 exprimieren, welche letztendlich drei verschiedene Photorezeptortypen hervorbringen, einen ultraviolett- , blau- und grün-sensitiven Photorezeptor. Die Opsin-Expressionsmuster unterschieden sich nicht nur zwischen den Geschlechtern, sondern auch im Expressionsbeginn der jeweiligen Opsine während der Retinaentwicklung. Immunfärbungen der sich entwickelnden Retina zeigten außerdem, dass die Retina von Honigbienen zu Beginn ihrer Entwicklung zunächst nur aus einer sehr dünnen Hypodermis besteht, jedoch bereits alle retinale Strukturen enthält. Die Photorezeptordeterminierung bei Honigbienen lässt auf einen zweistufigen Prozess schließen, da ab etwa der Mitte der Verpuppung die Opsinexpression signifikant zunimmt und Hand in Hand mit der Differenzierung der Rhabdome verläuft. Im ersten Schritt, während der späten Puppenphase, erfolgt die Festlegung des Photorezeptortyps in den jeweiligen Photorezeptorzellen. Im zweiten Schritt, kurz nach dem Schlupf der Biene, nimmt dann die Quantität der Opsinexpression stark zu, nämlich bis um das 25-fache. Bisher wurden die zugrundliegenden Mechanismen, die die verschiedenen Photorezeptortypen determinieren, zum Teil in Schmetterlingen, aber besonders intensiv in der Taufliege, Drosophila melanogaster, untersucht. Interessanterweise scheinen die molekularen Mechanismen innerhalb der Insekten konserviert zu sein und beispielsweise die zwei Transkriptionsfaktoren, spalt und spineless, welche während der Photorezeptordeterminierung in Fliegen und Schmetterlingen eine essenzielle Rolle spielen, auch in der Honigbiene identifiziert. In Kapitel 3 habe ich die Expressionsmuster dieser beiden Transkriptionsfaktoren während der Puppenentwicklung von Honigbienenarbeiterinnen untersucht und konnte zeigen, dass spalt hauptsächlich in den ersten Puppenstadien exprimiert wird was vermutlich mit dem Beginn der BLop -Expression korreliert. Spineless zeigte hingegen in der Mitte der Puppenentwicklung einen markantes Maximum in seiner mRNA Expression, was mit der Expression von Lop1 zusammenhängen könnte. Ob spalt und spineless jedoch auch in der Honigbiene eine Rolle in der Photorezeptordeterminierung spielen, bleibt noch zu untersuchen. Zum Beispiel durch einen Knockdown/out des jeweiligen Transkriptionsfaktors während der Retinaentwicklung, der zu einem spektralen Phänotyp, beispielsweise einem dichromatischen Auge, führt. Solche spektralen Phänotypen könnten dann in Verhaltensexperimenten getestet werden, um Aufschluss über die Funktion einzelner Photorezeptoren für das Farbensehen und die Synchronisierung der inneren Uhr gewinnen zu können. Um jedoch die Farbunterscheidungsfähigkeiten von Bienen und die Qualität in der Farbwahrnehmung evaluieren zu können ist ein zuverlässiger Verhaltensversuch vonnöten. Daher war es in Kapitel 4 mein Ziel, das visuelle PER Paradigma als passende Verhaltensmethode für das Testen von Farbensehen in Bienen zu etablieren. Seit mehreren Jahrzehnten gilt die visuelle Konditionierung der PER bei Bienen als schwierig und war bei der europäischen Honigbiene bisher ohne ein Abschneiden der Antennen oder ohne Präsentation weiterer Cues, wie Duft oder Bewegenung, nicht erfolgreich. Daher wurde das experimentelle Setup zunächst bei Hummeln etabliert, welche sich schon in anderen Studien als zuverlässige und robuste Versuchstiere herausgestellt hatten, beispielsweise während elektrophysiologischer Untersuchungen. Arbeiterinnen und Drohnen der schwarzen Erdhummel, Bombus terrestris, waren fähig verschiedene monochromatische Lichtstimuli mit einer Zuckerbelohnung zu assoziieren und schafften es auch, einen unbelohnten von einem belohnten Farbstimulus zu unterscheiden. Auch konnten sie den gelernten Stimulus nach zwei Stunden erneut abrufen und Arbeiterinnen zeigten die Fähigkeit, die gelernte Information erfolgreich in einen neuen Verhaltenskontext zu übertragen. Im nächsten Schritt wurde der Versuchsaufbau für Honigbienen adaptiert, sodass ich diesen in Kapitel 5 bei zwei mittelgroßen Honigbienenarten, der asiatischen Honigbiene, Apis cerana, und in der europäischen Honigbiene, Apis mellifera, verwenden konnte. Beide Honigbienenarten waren fähig, zwei monochromatische Lichtstimuli, Blau und Grün, mit Absorptionsmaxima von 435 nm und 528 nm, mit einer Belohnung zu assoziieren und zwischen beiden Stimuli zu unterscheiden. Ähnlich den Hummeln, konnten auch die asiatischen und europäischen Honigbienen den gelernten Stimulus erfolgreich nach zwei Stunden erneut abrufen. Die visuellen Konditionierungssetups und -Protokolle in meinen Untersuchungen unterschieden sich von denen vorangegangener Studien um einen entscheidenden Faktor, der von besonderer Bedeutung für eine erfolgreiche visuelle Konditionierung der PER von Bienen zu sein scheint, nämlich die Präsentationsdauer des konditionierten Stimulus. Da in vorangegangenen Studien eine visuelle Konditionierung der PER dazu tendierte nur dann erfolgsversprechend zu sein, wenn der konditionierte Stimulus für mehr als 10 s präsentiert wurde, habe ich in Kapitel 6 verschiedene Längen der Stimuluspräsentation systematisch getestet. Unmanipulierte Honigbienenarbeiterinnen konnten erfolgreich zwischen zwei monochromatischen Stimuli unterscheiden, wenn der Stimulus für 10 s präsentiert wurde, aber scheiterten, wenn die Stimuluspräsentation kürzer als 4 s war. Um ein vergleichbareres Konditionieren der Bienen zu ermöglichen, entwickelte ich ein neues Setup, welches einen Shutter beinhaltete, der durch ein PC basiertes Softwareprogramm gesteuert wurde. Das überarbeitete Setup ermöglicht eine präzisiere und automatisierte visuelle PER Konditionierung und bietet nun für zukünftige Studien eine exzellente Methode, visuelle Wahrnehmung und Kognition von Bienen unter konstanten und kontrollierten Bedingungen zu untersuchen.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Leonie Lichtenstein
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-150997
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Fakultät für Biologie
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie
Graduate Schools / Graduate School of Life Sciences
Referee:PD Dr. Johannes Spaethe
Date of final exam:2017/06/23
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
GND Keyword:Biene; Komplexauge; Farbensehen; Netzhaut; Entwicklung
Tag:bees; color vision; compound eyes; retinal development
Release Date:2018/06/25
Licence (German):License LogoDeutsches Urheberrecht mit Print on Demand