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Phenological response of grassland species to manipulative snowmelt and drought along an altitudinal gradient

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-77969
  • Plant communities in the European Alps are assumed to be highly affected by climate change since temperature rise in this region is above the global average. It is predicted that higher temperatures will lead to advanced snowmelt dates and that the number of extreme weather events will increase. The aims of this study were to determine the impacts of extreme climatic events on flower phenology and to assess whether those impacts differed between lower and higher altitudes. In 2010 an experiment simulating advanced and delayed snowmelt as wellPlant communities in the European Alps are assumed to be highly affected by climate change since temperature rise in this region is above the global average. It is predicted that higher temperatures will lead to advanced snowmelt dates and that the number of extreme weather events will increase. The aims of this study were to determine the impacts of extreme climatic events on flower phenology and to assess whether those impacts differed between lower and higher altitudes. In 2010 an experiment simulating advanced and delayed snowmelt as well as drought event was conducted along an altitudinal transect ca. every 250m (600-2000 m a.s.l.) in the Berchtesgaden National Park, Germany. The study showed that flower phenology is strongly affected by altitude; however there were few effects of the manipulative treatments on flowering. The effects of advanced snowmelt were significantly greater at higher than at lower sites, but no significant difference was found between both altitudinal bands for the other treatments. The response of flower phenology to temperature declined through the season and the length of flowering duration was not significantly influenced by treatments. The stronger effect of advanced snowmelt at higher altitudes might be a response to differences in treatment intensity across the gradient. Consequently, shifts in the date of snowmelt due to global warming may affect species more at higher than at lower altitudes since changes may be more pronounced at higher altitudes. Our data indicate a rather low risk of drought events on flowering phenology in the Bavarian Alps.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: C. Cornelius, A. Leingärtner, B. Hoiss, J. Krauss, I. Steffan-Dewenter, A. Menzel
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-77969
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Year of Completion:2012
Source:In: Journal of Experimental Botany (2013) 64, 1, 241–251. doi:10.1093/jxb/ers321.
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 59 Tiere (Zoologie) / 590 Tiere (Zoologie)
GND Keyword:Biologie
Tag:Advanced snowmelt; Alps; BBCH; Climate change; Delayed snowmelt; Flowering
Release Date:2013/05/23
Note:
ist zugleich: IV. Kapitel der Dissertation von Bernhard Hoiß
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-NC-ND: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Nicht kommerziell, Keine Bearbeitung