• search hit 7 of 493
Back to Result List

Amphibian diversity along the slope of Mount Kilimanjaro: from species to genes

Diversität von Amphibien im Höhengradienten des Mount Kilimanjaro: von Arten zu Genen

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-91792
  • 1. Since the early nineteenth century describing (and understanding) patterns of distribution of biodiversity across the Earth has represented one of the most significant intellectual challenges to ecologists and biogeographers. Among the most striking patterns of species richness are: the latitudinal and elevational gradients, with peaks in number of species at low latitudes and somewhere at mid altitudes, although other patterns, e.g. declines with increasing elevation, are often observed. Even in highly diverse tropical regions, species1. Since the early nineteenth century describing (and understanding) patterns of distribution of biodiversity across the Earth has represented one of the most significant intellectual challenges to ecologists and biogeographers. Among the most striking patterns of species richness are: the latitudinal and elevational gradients, with peaks in number of species at low latitudes and somewhere at mid altitudes, although other patterns, e.g. declines with increasing elevation, are often observed. Even in highly diverse tropical regions, species richness is not evenly distributed but there are “hotspots” of biodiversity where an exceptional number of species, especially endemics, are concentrated. Unfortunately, such areas are also experiencing dramatic loss of habitat. Among vertebrate taxa, amphibians are facing the most alarming number of extinctions. Habitat destruction, pollution and emergence of infectious diseases such as chytridiomycosis, are causing worldwide population declines. Responses to these drivers can be multidirectional and subtle, i.e. they may not be captured at the species but at the genetic level. Moreover, present patterns of diversity can result from the influence of past geological, climatic and environmental changes. In this study, I used a multidisciplinary and multilevel approach to understand how and to which extent the landscape influences amphibian diversity. Mount Kilimanjaro is an exceptional tropical region where the landscape is rapidly evolving due to land use changes; additionally, there is a broad lack of knowledge of its amphibian fauna. During two rainy seasons in 2011, I recorded anurans from the foothills to 3500 m altitude; in addition, I focused on two river frog species and collected tissue samples for genetic analysis and swabs for detection of chytridiomycosis, the deadly disease caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). 2. I analyzed how species richness and composition change with increasing elevation and anthropogenic disturbance. In order to disentangle the observed patterns of species diversity and distribution, I incorporated inferences from historical biogeography and compared the assemblage of Mt. Kilimanjaro and Mt. Meru (both recent volcanoes) with those of the older Eastern Arc Mountains. Species richness decreased with elevation and locally increased in presence of water bodies, but I did not detect effects of either anthropogenic disturbance or vegetation structure on species richness and composition. Moreover, I found a surprisingly low number of forest species. Historical events seem to underlie the current pattern of species distribution; the young age of Mt. Kilimanjaro and the complex biogeographic processes which occurred in East Africa during the last 20 million years prevented montane forest frogs from colonizing the volcano. 3. I focused on the genetic level of biodiversity and investigated how the landscape, i.e. elevation, topographic relief and land cover, influence genetic variation, population structure and gene flow of two ecologically similar and closely related river frog species, namely Amietia angolensis and Amietia wittei. I detected greater genetic differentiation among populations in the highland species (A. wittei) and higher genetic variation in the lowland species (A. angolensis), although genetic diversity was not significantly correlated with elevation. Importantly, human settlements seemed to restrict gene flow in A. angolensis, whereas steep slopes were positively correlated with gene flow in A. wittei. This results show that even ecologically similar species can respond differently to landscape processes and that the spatial configuration of topographic features combined with species-specific biological attributes can affect dispersal and gene flow in disparate ways. 4. River frogs of the genus Amietia seem to be particularly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, showing the highest pathogen load in Kenya and other African countries. In the last study, I collected swab samples from larvae of A. angolensis and A. wittei for Bd detection. Both species resulted Bd-positive. The presence of Bd on Mt. Kilimanjaro has serious implication. For instance, Bd can be transported by footwear of hikers from contaminated water and soil. Tourists visiting Mt. Kilimanjaro may translocate Bd zoospores to other areas such as the nearby Eastern Arc Mts. where endemic and vulnerable species may still be naïve to the fungus and thus suffer of population declines. 5. My study significantly contributed to the knowledge of the amphibian fauna of Mt. Kilimanjaro and of East Africa in general, and it represents a valuable tool for future conservation actions and measures. Finally, it highlights the importance of using a multidisciplinary (i.e. community ecology, historical biogeography, landscape genetics, disease ecology) and multilevel (i.e. community, species, population, gene) approach to disentangle patterns of biodiversity.show moreshow less
  • Seit Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts ist es eine der größten intellektuellen Herausforderungen für Ökologen und Biogeographen, die Verteilungsmuster der Biodiversität auf der Erde zu beschreiben und letztlich zu verstehen. Zu den auffälligsten Mustern des Artenreichtums gehören die Gradienten, die sich in Abhängigkeit von der geographischer Breite und der Höhe über dem Meeresspiegel ergeben. Dabei treten Maxima der Artenzahl in den niederen Breiten und stellenweise in mittleren Höhenregionen auf; es lassen sich aber auch andere Muster beobachten,Seit Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts ist es eine der größten intellektuellen Herausforderungen für Ökologen und Biogeographen, die Verteilungsmuster der Biodiversität auf der Erde zu beschreiben und letztlich zu verstehen. Zu den auffälligsten Mustern des Artenreichtums gehören die Gradienten, die sich in Abhängigkeit von der geographischer Breite und der Höhe über dem Meeresspiegel ergeben. Dabei treten Maxima der Artenzahl in den niederen Breiten und stellenweise in mittleren Höhenregionen auf; es lassen sich aber auch andere Muster beobachten, z.B. eine Abnahme der Artenzahl mit zunehmender Höhe. Selbst in den hochdiversen Tropen sind Arten nicht gleichmäßig verteilt. So gibt es sog. „hotspots“ der Biodiversität mit einer außergewöhnlich großen Zahl von Arten (meist Endemiten). Gerade diese Regionen sind es, die heute dramatische 1. Seit Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts ist es eine der größten intellektuellen Herausforderungen für Ökologen und Biogeographen, die Verteilungsmuster der Biodiversität auf der Erde zu beschreiben und letztlich zu verstehen. Zu den auffälligsten Mustern des Artenreichtums gehören die Gradienten, die sich in Abhängigkeit von der geographischer Breite und der Höhe über dem Meeresspiegel ergeben. Dabei treten Maxima der Artenzahl in den niederen Breiten und stellenweise in mittleren Höhenregionen auf; es lassen sich aber auch andere Muster beobachten, z.B. eine Abnahme der Artenzahl mit zunehmender Höhe. Selbst in den hochdiversen Tropen sind Arten nicht gleichmäßig verteilt. So gibt es sog. „hotspots“ der Biodiversität mit einer außergewöhnlich großen Zahl von Arten (meist Endemiten). Gerade diese Regionen sind es, die heute dramatische Habitatverluste verzeichnen. Unter den Wirbeltieren sind es die Amphibien, die dabei die höchsten Aussterberaten aufweisen. Ihre Populationen gehen weltweit zurück, wofür neben Lebensraumzerstörung auch Umweltverschmutzung und die Ausbreitung von Infektionskrankheiten, z.B. Chytridiomykose, verantwortlich sind. Reaktionen auf solche Faktoren können vielschichtig sein und fast unmerklich bleiben, was bedeutet, dass sie nicht auf Artniveau, sondern nur auf genetischer Ebene erfasst werden können. Hinzu kommt, dass die aktuellen Muster der Biodiversität auf den Einfluss vergangener Veränderungen hinsichtlich Geologie, Klima und Umwelt zurückgeführt werden können ...show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Giulia Zancolli
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-91792
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Graduate Schools
Faculties:Graduate Schools / Graduate School of Life Sciences
Referee:Prof. Dr. Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Prof. Dr. Dieter Mahsberg, Prof. Dr. Mark-Oliver Rödel
Date of final exam:2013/12/18
Language:English
Year of Completion:2013
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
GND Keyword:Kilimandscharo; Lurche; Biodiversität
Tag:Amphibien; Vielfalt
biodiversity
Release Date:2014/12/10
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung