• search hit 91 of 123
Back to Result List

Learning in botanical gardens: Investigating educational methods during an instruction about plants and water

Lernen in Botanischen Gärten: Die Untersuchung von Lehrmethoden während einer Intervention über Pflanzen und Wasser

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-111620
  • The contribution of botanical gardens to out-of-school education should be larger than it is currently in Germany. In the curricula of all school types botany plays only a minor role, although plants form the base for all animal life on earth. To increase the attractiveness of botanical gardens for teachers, offers and programs should be created and conducted in didactically sensible manners and allow students an emotional approach towards the topics through trial and experiments. Therefore it is insufficient to conduct guided tours, which areThe contribution of botanical gardens to out-of-school education should be larger than it is currently in Germany. In the curricula of all school types botany plays only a minor role, although plants form the base for all animal life on earth. To increase the attractiveness of botanical gardens for teachers, offers and programs should be created and conducted in didactically sensible manners and allow students an emotional approach towards the topics through trial and experiments. Therefore it is insufficient to conduct guided tours, which are still most common. Student-centered methods, like learning at workstations, or experimental courses, can lead to an improved retention of the contents learned at the out-of-school learning setting. There are, however, methodological differences even within learning at workstations. In the first part of my study I compared a student- (S) and a teacher-centered (T) type of learning at workstations (chapter III). My intention was to find out, which of both methods results in more positive emotions at the out-of-school learning location and a higher sustainable knowledge increase. Like in all three parts of my study, 8th grade students from so-called “Mittelschulen” and “Realschulen” from Lower Franconia participated in the programs. I evaluated them by using multiple-choice tests assessing the students' knowledge regarding the topic 'plants and water' (see Appendix), following a before-after / control-impact study design. The students' emotions were assessed using the intrinsic motivation inventory directly after the garden visit. Using generalized linear mixed models, I did not find a significant difference between either of the two approaches. A reason for this could be that the students could be practically active in both methods, which made them fairly similar. Given that there was a significant knowledge increase in both methods, and the effort to develop the teacher-centered learning at workstations was much lower, I would suggest to follow that method for educational work in botanical gardens. Students already have many predefined concepts regarding many topics, especially when these are important in everyday life. These concepts do often not match the scientific state-of-the-art. Still, students bring their so-called 'alternative conceptions' into visits to the botanical garden. According to theory, confronting them with their own conceptions in the light of scientific facts, should foster updating their concepts with scientifically correct additions. To investigate this method regarding my topic 'plants and water', I developed an intervention with experiments on the lotus effect, which also plays a role in everyday life (chapter IV). Topics like the surface tension of the water, which is also found in 6th grade curricula in German schools, were included. Prior to the intervention, I assessed the students' conceptions using questionnaires and used the three most frequent alternative conceptions to develop a multiple-choice test, which was also used in a before-after / control-impact design. A group of students was also confronted with their conceptions during an introductory talk (AC), whereas another was not (NAC). This was conducted in a way, that likely led to dissatisfaction of the students with their own concepts. The analysis of the questionnaires with the Mann-Whitney U test showed, however, no difference between the two groups directly following the treatment. Over longer time, however, the NAC group retained significantly more knowledge. Probably the students confronted with the alternative conceptions remembered the illustrations of these more easily than the scientifically correct view. For some botanical topics it is certainly helpful to include this conceptual change approach, but apparently not for the lotus effect. In this case it is most sensible to focus on the surface structure of water-repellent leaves and fruits, as we describe it in a publication in 'Unterricht Biologie'. For the practical work in botanical gardens I would suggest to rather assess the students' concepts and assumptions in the beginning of an intervention in a botanical garden, especially with respect to feasibility. In the third part of my study I concentrate on the application of concept maps (chapter V). This method of cross-linking old and newly acquired knowledge is effective, but not very common in Germany, neither in schools, nor in botanical gardens. One group of students followed exclusively a teacher-centered learning at workstations regarding 'plants and water' (NCM), a second group created concept maps directly after the treatment and a second directly before the retention test (CM). The first map was intended to be a means of consolidation, whereas the late map was rather focused on recapitulation of what was learned about six weeks ago. To evaluate that I used the same multiple-choice tests as I did for the first part. The CM group showed a significantly higher knowledge increase, over short and long time-scales, although these students did significantly worse in the pretest than those of the NCM group. Regarding genders, female students profited especially from the first concept map (consolidation), males rather from the second (recapitulation). From the results one can conclude that prominently weaker students benefit from this method. Additionally the gender-related results show that using concept maps multiple times can be beneficial for different types of learners. In every study there also was a control group (C), which only had to fill out the questionnaires at the same time as the participating students, to account for external factors (like media, etc.). Especially learning at workstations and concept maps are very appropriate to be conducted at the out-of-school learning location botanical garden and are likely to strongly increase learning success. It is beneficial to mix several methods to achieve the best results in different types of learners. Additionally, when methods in school are mixed with those of out-of-school learning, the education gets more open, practical and colorful. That all resulted in a substantial long-term knowledge gain of all participating students.show moreshow less
  • Der Beitrag botanischer Gärten zur außerschulischen Bildung sollte größer sein, als er momentan in Deutschland ist, denn in den Lehrplänen aller Schularten spielt die Botanik eine sehr geringe Rolle, obwohl Pflanzen die Grundlage allen tierischen Lebens sind. Doch um diesen Lernort für Lehrer attraktiver zu machen, sollten die Programme und Angebote didaktisch aufbereitet sein und den Schülern durch Ausprobieren und Experimentieren einen emotionalen Zugang bieten. Hierfür genügt es nicht, Führungen und Lehrervorträge durchzuführen, welche nochDer Beitrag botanischer Gärten zur außerschulischen Bildung sollte größer sein, als er momentan in Deutschland ist, denn in den Lehrplänen aller Schularten spielt die Botanik eine sehr geringe Rolle, obwohl Pflanzen die Grundlage allen tierischen Lebens sind. Doch um diesen Lernort für Lehrer attraktiver zu machen, sollten die Programme und Angebote didaktisch aufbereitet sein und den Schülern durch Ausprobieren und Experimentieren einen emotionalen Zugang bieten. Hierfür genügt es nicht, Führungen und Lehrervorträge durchzuführen, welche noch immer zu hohen Prozentsätzen stattfinden. Schülerzentrierte Methoden, wie das Lernen an Stationen, oder experimentelle Praktika, können dazu führen, dass das am außerschulischen Lernort (ASL) Gelernte besser im Gedächtnis bleibt. Jedoch gibt es auch beim Lernen an Stationen methodische Unterschiede. Im ersten Teil meiner Studie habe ich eine schülerzentrierte (S) gegen eine lehrerzentrierte (T) Form des Lernens an Stationen gegeneinander getestet (siehe Kapitel III), um herauszufinden, welche der beiden Methoden zu positiveren Emotionen am ASL und einem erhöhten, anhaltenden Wissenszuwachs führt. Wie bei allen drei Teilen meiner Studie nahmen Schüler und Schülerinnen der 8. Jahrgangstufe von Mittel-und Realschulen aus Unterfranken teil. Evaluiert wurde mithilfe eines selbst entwickelten Multiple-Choice-Tests zum Wissen der Schüler und Schülerinnen zum Thema Wasser und Pflanzen (siehe Appendix 5). Dieser Test erfolgte als Vor- und Nachtest sowie als verzögerter Behaltenstest (retention). Die Emotionen der Schüler und Schülerinnen wurden über den IMI-Fragebogen (intrinsic motivation inventory) direkt nach dem Besuch im botanischen Garten einmalig erfragt. Weder beim Wissenstest, noch bei den Emotionen, ergab sich nach Auswertung mittels generalisierter gemischter linearer Modelle (GLMM) ein klares Signal für eine der beiden Methoden. Ein Grund könnte sein, dass bei beiden Formen des Lernens an Stationen die Schüler und Schülerinnen auch praktisch aktiv werden konnten, sich die Methoden somit sehr ähnelten. Da bei beiden Methoden insgesamt signifikant dazu gelernt wurde und das eher lehrerzentierte Lernen an Stationen nicht so aufwändig war in der Entwicklung wie das schülerzentrierte, würde ich den botanischen Gärten erstere Methode für die Bildungsarbeit empfehlen. Schüler und Schülerinnen haben zu vielen Themen, vor allem des Alltags, bereits ganz eigene Konzepte und Vorstellungen, die nicht unbedingt denen das aktuellen wissenschaftlichen Standes entsprechen. So kommen die Schüler und Schülerinnen natürlich auch mit diesen individuellen Konzepten in den botanischen Garten. Hier sollte nun auch auf diese sogenannten “alternativen Konzepte” eingegangen werden, da diese Konfrontation, laut Theorie, die Übernahme neuer, wissenschaftlich korrekter Bausteine in das bereits vorhandene Konzept fördern soll. Um bei dem Thema Wasser und Pflanzen zu bleiben und gleichzeitig ein alltagsrelevantes Thema anzusprechen, habe ich ein Praktikum und Experimente zum Lotuseffekt entwickelt und die Vorstellungen der Schüler und Schülerinnen dazu erfragt (siehe chapter IV). Hierbei spielten auch Themen wie die Oberflächenspannung von Wasser eine Rolle, was in Deutschland in der 6. Klasse angesprochen wird. Aus nicht korrekten Vorstellungen wurden die drei häufigsten ausgesucht und daraus ein Multiple-Choice-Test entwickelt, der ebenfalls als Vor-, Nach- und Behaltenstest fungierte. In einem einführenden Vortrag zum Lotuseffekt wurde ein Teil der Schüler und Schülerinnen (AC) zusätzlich mit diesen alternativen Vorstellungen konfrontiert, über Bilder und im Unterrichtsgespräch. Dies erfolgte in einer Art und Weise, sodass die Schüler und Schülerinnen mit der eigenen Vorstellung unzufrieden wurden. Eine zweite Gruppe wurde während des Vortrags nicht mit ihren alternativen Vorstellungen konfrontiert (NAC). Die Auswertung der Fragebögen über den Mann-Whitney U Test ergab keinen Unterschied zwischen den beiden Gruppen im Hinblick auf den kurzfristigen Wissenserwerb. Die Gruppe jedoch, welche nicht mit ihren alternativen Vorstellungen konfrontiert wurde (NAC), lernte langfristig im Vergleich zu der AC-Gruppe signifikant mehr dazu. Womöglich erinnerten sich die Schüler und Schülerinnen der AC-Gruppe nur noch an die Bilder der falschen und nicht an die der wissenschaftlich korrekten Vorstellung und wurden somit irritiert. Bei einigen botanischen Themen ist es sicherlich von Vorteil, die alternativen Vorstellungen der Schüler und Schülerinnen einzubringen, vielleicht nicht unbedingt beim Lotuseffekt. Hier sollte man sich, wie in einem von uns dazu verfassten Artikel in der Unterricht Biologie beschrieben sein wird, auf die Oberflächenstruktur von wasserabweisenden Blättern und Früchten beschränken. Für die pädagogische Arbeit in botanischen Gärten würde ich die mündliche Abfrage der Vorstellungen und Vermutungen der Schüler und Schülerinnen zu Beginn eines Programmes aus Gründen der besseren und schnelleren Umsetzbarkeit empfehlen. Im dritten Teil meiner Studie beschäftigte ich mich mit der Anwendung von Concept Maps (siehe Kapitel V). Diese Methode des Vernetzens von altem und neu erworbenem Wissen ist effektiv, aber weder in deutschen Schulen, noch in botanischen Gärten weit verbreitet. Eine Gruppe folgte ausschließlich dem lehrerzentrierten Lernen an Stationen zu Wasser und Pflanzen (NCM), eine zweite Gruppe erstellte direkt im Anschluss an das lehrerzentrierte Lernen an Stationen sowie direkt vor dem Behaltenstest eine Concept Map (CM). Die erste Map diente hierbei als Sicherungsform des gerade Gelernten und die späte Map als Wiederholung des vor circa sechs Wochen Gelernten. Als Evaluationsinstrument diente erneut der eigens entwickelte Multiple-Choice-Wissenstest aus der ersten Teilstudie. Die CM-Gruppe zeigte einen signifikant größeren Lernzuwachs, kurz- wie auch langfristig, im Vergleich zur NCM-Gruppe, obwohl die CM-Gruppe im Vortest signifikant schlechter war. Im Hinblick auf die Geschlechter haben die Mädchen vor allem von der ersten Sicherungs-Map und die Jungen mehr von der Wiederholungs-Map profitiert. Anhand der Ergebnisse kann man schlussfolgern, dass vor allem schwächere Schüler und Schülerinnen von dieser Methode profitieren. Außerdem zeigen die Ergebnisse zu den Geschlechtern, dass das mehrmalige Anwenden von Concept Maps unterschiedliche Lerntypen fördern kann. Bei jeder der drei Studien gab es eine Kontrollgruppe (C), die ausschließlich die Fragebögen im Abstand von sechs bis acht Wochen in der Schule beantworten musste. Dies diente dem Ausschließen von Vorkomnissen in der Öffentlichkeit und dem Umfeld der Schüler und Schülerinnen, was deren Wissen zu Wasser und Pflanzen und dem Lotuseffekt hätte erheblich steigern können. Vor allem das Lernen an Stationen sowie die Concept Maps lassen sich sehr gut am ASL botanischer Garten durchführen und können zu einem größeren Lernerfolg führen. Am besten spricht man hier die meisten Lerntypen an, wenn man während der Programme möglichst viele verschiedene Methoden anwendet. Dazu kommt, dass man neben den Methoden aus der Schule natürlich auch die des ASL einbringt und so der Unterricht automatisch anschaulicher, offener und praktischer wird. Dies alles hat dazu geführt, das alle Gruppen langfristig signifikant dazu gelernt haben.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Franziska Kubisch (geb. Wiegand)
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-111620
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Fakultät für Biologie
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Referee:Dr. Thomas Heyne, Prof. Dr. Franz Xaver Bogner, Prof. Dr. Thomas Dandekar
Date of final exam:2015/03/27
Language:English
Year of Completion:2014
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
GND Keyword:Konstruktive Didaktik; Botanischer Garten; Lernort; Stationenarbeit
Tag:Out-of-school learning settings; botanical gardens; concept maps; conceptual change; learning at workstations
Release Date:2015/04/01
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-SA: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen