• search hit 2 of 7
Back to Result List

Molecular modelling and simulation of retroviral proteins and nanobiocomposites

Simulationen und Interaktionen viraler Proteine sowie von Kohlenstoffenanoröhren mit Membranen und Proteinen

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-56960
  • Molecular modelling and simulation are powerful methods in providing important in-formation on different biological systems to elucidate their structural and functional proper-ties, which cannot be determined in experiment. These methods are applied to analyse versa-tile biological systems: lipid membrane bilayers stabilized by an intercalated single wall carbon nanotube and retroviral proteins such as HIV protease and integrase. HIV-1 integrase has nuclear localization signals (NLS) which play a crucial role in nuclear import of viralMolecular modelling and simulation are powerful methods in providing important in-formation on different biological systems to elucidate their structural and functional proper-ties, which cannot be determined in experiment. These methods are applied to analyse versa-tile biological systems: lipid membrane bilayers stabilized by an intercalated single wall carbon nanotube and retroviral proteins such as HIV protease and integrase. HIV-1 integrase has nuclear localization signals (NLS) which play a crucial role in nuclear import of viral preintegration complex (PIC). However, the detailed mechanisms of PIC formation and its nuclear transport are not known. Previously it was shown that NLSs bind to the cell transport machinery e.g. proteins of nuclear pore complex such as transportins. I investigated the interaction of this viral protein HIV-1 integrase with proteins of the nuclear pore complex such as transportin-SR2 (Shityakov et al., 2010). I showed that the transportin-SR2 in nuclear import is required due to its interaction with the HIV-1 integrase. I analyzed key domain interaction, and hydrogen bond formation in transportin-SR2. These results were discussed in comparison to other retroviral species such as foamy viruses to better understand this specific and efficient retroviral trafficking route. The retroviral nuclear import was next analyzed in experiments regarding the retroviral ability to infect nondividing cells. To accomplish the gene transfer task successfully, ret-roviruses must efficiently transduce different cell cultures at different phases of cell cycle. However, promising and safe foamy viral vectors used for gene transfer are unable to effi-ciently infect quiescent cells. This drawback was due to their inability to create a preintegra-tion complex (PIC) for nuclear import of retroviral DNA. On the contrary, the lentiviral vec-tors are not dependant on cell cycle. In the course of reverse transcription the polypurine tract (PPT) is believed to be crucial for PIC formation. In this thesis, I compared the transduction frequencies of PPT modified FV vectors with lentiviral vectors in nondividing and dividing alveolar basal epithelial cells from human adenocarcinoma (A549) by using molecular cloning, transfection and transduction techniques and several other methods. In contrast to lentiviral vectors, FV vectors were not able to effi-ciently transduce nondividing cell (Shityakov and Rethwilm, unpublished data). Despite the findings, which support the use of FV vectors as a safe and efficient alternative to lentiviral vectors, major limitation in terms of foamy-based retroviral vector gene transfer in quiescent cells still remains. Many attempts have been made recently to search for the potential molecules as pos-sible drug candidates to treat HIV infection for over decades now. These molecules can be retrieved from chemical libraries or can be designed on a computer screen and then synthe-sized in a laboratory. Most notably, one could use the computerized structure as a reference to determine the types of molecules that might block the enzyme. Such structure-based drug design strategies have the potential to save off years and millions of dollars compared to a more traditional trial-and-error drug development process. After the crystal structure of the HIV-encoded protease enzyme had been elucidated, computer-aided drug design played a pivotal role in the development of new compounds that inhibit this enzyme which is responsible for HIV maturation and infectivity. Promising repre-sentatives of these compounds have recently found their way to patients. Protease inhibitors show a powerful sustained suppression of HIV-1 replication, especially when used in combi-nation therapy regimens. However, these drugs are becoming less effective to more resistant HIV strains due to multiple mutations in the retroviral proteases. In computational drug design I used molecular modelling methods such as lead ex-pansion algorithm (Tripos®) to create a virtual library of compounds with different binding affinities to protease binding site. In addition, I heavily applied computer assisted combinato-rial chemistry approaches to design and optimize virtual libraries of protease inhibitors and performed in silico screening and pharmacophore-similarity scoring of these drug candidates. Further computational analyses revealed one unique compound with different protease bind-ing ability from the initial hit and its role for possible new class of protease inhibitors is dis-cussed (Shityakov and Dandekar, 2009). A number of atomistic models were developed to elucidate the nanotube behaviour in lipid bilayers. However, none of them provided useful information for CNT effect upon the lipid membrane bilayer for implementing all-atom models that will allow us to calculate the deviations of lipid molecules from CNT with atomistic precision. Unfortunately, the direct experimental investigation of nanotube behaviour in lipid bilayer remains quite a tricky prob-lem opening the door before the molecular simulation techniques. In this regard, more de-tailed multi-scale simulations are needed to clearly understand the stabilization characteristics of CNTs in hydrophobic environment. The phenomenon of an intercalated single-wall carbon nanotube in the center of lipid membrane was extensively studied and analyzed. The root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation functions were calculated in order to measure stability of lipid mem-branes. The results indicated that an intercalated carbon nanotube restrains the conformational freedom of adjacent lipids and hence has an impact on the membrane stabilization dynamics (Shityakov and Dandekar, 2011). On the other hand, different lipid membranes may have dissimilarities due to the differing abilities to create a bridge formation between the adherent lipid molecules. The results derived from this thesis will help to develop stable nanobiocom-posites for construction of novel biomaterials and delivery of various biomolecules for medi-cine and biology.show moreshow less
  • Molekulare Modellierung und Simulationen sind leistungsstarke Methoden, um wich-tige Informationen von verschiedenen biologischen Systemen, welche nicht durch Experi-mente erschlossen werden können, darzustellen, und deren strukturelle und funktionelle Ei-genschaften aufzuklären. Diese Arbeit untersucht in Simulationen Interaktionen viraler Proteinen sowie von Kohlenstoffenanoröhren mit Membranen und Proteinen. Die HIV-1 Integrase besitzt Kernlokalisierungssignale („nuclear localization signals [NLS]“), welche eine entscheidende Rolle beimMolekulare Modellierung und Simulationen sind leistungsstarke Methoden, um wich-tige Informationen von verschiedenen biologischen Systemen, welche nicht durch Experi-mente erschlossen werden können, darzustellen, und deren strukturelle und funktionelle Ei-genschaften aufzuklären. Diese Arbeit untersucht in Simulationen Interaktionen viraler Proteinen sowie von Kohlenstoffenanoröhren mit Membranen und Proteinen. Die HIV-1 Integrase besitzt Kernlokalisierungssignale („nuclear localization signals [NLS]“), welche eine entscheidende Rolle beim Import des viralen Präintegrationskomplexes („preintegration complex [PIC]“) in den Zellkern spielen. Die Ausbildung des PIC und sein Import in den Zellkern sind im Detail noch nicht bekannt. Es wurde bereits gezeigt, dass die NLS an Moleküle des Zelltransportsystems binden, wie z.B. an Transportinkernporen. Im Rahmen meiner Arbeit untersuchte ich die Interaktionen der viralen HIV-1 Integrase mit Proteinen der Kernporen wie dem Transportin-SR2 Protein (Shityakov et al., 2010). Hierbei wurden die möglichen Interaktionen des Transportin-SR2 Protein mit der HIV-1-Integrase und die Bedeutung dieser Interaktionen mit dem Import in den Kern aufgezeigt. Zudem wur-den die Interaktionen der Schlüsseldomänen und die Ausbildung von Wasserstoffbrücken-bindungen im dem Transportin-SR2 Protein untersucht. Die Ergebnisse wurden mit Protein-komplexen andere retroviralen Spezies, wie z.B. dem humanen Spumaretrovirus („human foamy virus [HFV]“), verglichen, um diesen spezifischen und sehr effizienten retroviralen Transportweg in die Wirtszelle zu entschlüsseln. Der experimentelle Teil dieser Arbeit beschäftigte sich damit, den retroviralen Kern-import zu untersuchen, um die Fähigkeit des Retrovirus, nicht teilende Zellen zu infizieren, besser zu verstehen verstanden wird. Um dies zu bewerkstelligen, müssen Retroviren Zellkul-turen in verschiedenen Stadien des Zellzyklus effizient transduzieren. Vielversprechende und sichere- HFV- Vektoren, welche in der Gentherapie eingesetzt werden könnten, sind nicht in der Lage, diese Effizienz bei ruhenden Zellen zu gewährleisten. Dies rührte daher, dass diese nicht in der Lage waren, einen PIC für den Transport der retroviralen DNA auszubilden. Lentivirale Vektoren sind dagegen nicht auf einen bestimmten Zellzyklus angewiesen. Für die reverse Transkription ist der Polypurinteil („polypurine tract [PPT]“) essentiell für die Ausbildung der PIC. In dieser Doktorarbeit vergleiche ich die Transduktionsfrequenz von PPT-modifizierten HFV-Vektoren mit denen von lentiviralen Vektoren in nichtteilenden und tei-lenden Lungenkarzinomepithelzellen. Hierbei wurden Methoden wie Klonierung, Transfektion, und Transduktion (wie auch weitere Methoden) angewendet. Im Gegensatz zu lentiviralen Vektoren konnten HFV-Vektoren sich nicht teilende Zellen in meinen Versuchen nicht effizient transduzieren (Shityakov und Rethwiln, unveröffentlicht). Trotz der Befunde, dass HFV-Vektoren sichere und effiziente Alternativen zu lentiviralen Vektoren darstellen, bestehen immer noch große Einschränkungen, diese HFV-basierten, retroviralen Vektoren für Gentherapien bei ruhenden Zellen einzusetzen. Viele Versuche wurden unternommen, um mögliche, vielversprechende Moleküle, welche als Wirkstoffe für eine HIV-Therapie eingesetzt werden könnten, zu finden. Diese Moleküle können aus chemischen Substanzbibliotheken bezogen werden oder am Computer in silico entworfen und dann synthetisiert werden. Digitalisierte Strukturen können als Refe-renzen benutzt werden, um besser herauszufinden, wie diese Moleküle Typen diverse Enzy-me blokieren könnten. Strukturbasiertes Wirkstoffdesign hat das Potential, viele Jahre und Geld an Entwicklungskosten einzusparen. Nachdem die Kristallstruktur der HIV-kodierten Proteasen aufgeklärt war, spielte das computergestützte Wirkstoffdesign eine zentrale Rolle bei der Entwicklung neuer Wirkstoffe gegen die Protease. Vielversprechende Vertreter dieser Wirkstoffklasse werden seit kurzem nun auch für die Behandlung von Patienten eingesetzt. Proteaseinhibitoren zeigen eine wir-kungsvolle und langanhaltende Inhibition der HIV-1-Replikation; besonders dann, wenn sie in Kombinationstherapien eingesetzt werden. Aber diese Wirkstoffe werden immer weniger effektiv, je resistenter die HIV-Stämme durch Mutationen in den retroviralen Proteasen wer-den. Im Rahmen meiner Arbeit mit computergestütztem Wirkstoffdesign nutzte ich Model-lierungsmethoden wie den „lead expansion algorithm“ (Tripos®) um virtuelle Wirkstoffbibli-otheken mit verschiedenen Affinitäten zur Proteasebindungsstelle zu erstellen. Zusätzlich wandte ich Verfahren der computergestützten, kombinatorischen Chemie an, um virtuelle Bibliotheken von Proteaseinhibitoren zu designen, und zu verbessern. Parallel dazu wurde eine in silico Selektion sowie eine Einteilung nach Pharmakophorähnlichkeiten für diese Kandidaten vorgenommen. Weiterführende computergestützte Analysen förderten einen ein-zigartigen Wirkstoff zu Tage, welcher neuartige Proteasebindungseigenschaften aufweist, und dessen Rolle für eine potentiell neuartige Klasse von Proteaseinhibitoren schon beschrieben wurde (Shityakov und Dandekar, 2009). Eine Reihe von Modellen mit atomarer Auflösung wurden bereits entwickelt, um das Verhalten von Nanoröhren in Lipid-Doppelschichten aufzuklären. Die Auswirkungen auf die molekular Dynamik einer einschichtigen Karbonnanoröhre, welche in das Zentrum einer Lipid-Doppelschicht eingefügt wurde, wurden intensiv studiert und analysiert. Die Normalabweichung und Fluktuationen wurden berechnet, um eine Aussage über die Stabilität der Lipid-Doppelschichten treffen zu können. Die Ergebnisse weisen darauf hin, dass eine eingefügte Karbonnanoröhre die Freiheit für Konformationsänderungen bei nahegelegenen Lipiden einschränkt und dadurch einen Einfluss auf die Membranstabilität hat (Shityakov und Dandekar, 2011). Es kann aber außer-dem sein, dass verschiedene Lipid-Doppelschichten Unterschiede in ihrer Fähigkeit, Brücken zwischen benachbarten Lipiden auszubilden, aufweisen. Viren und Karbonnanoröhren werden damit in verschiedenen dynamischen Simulati-onen untersucht, um mehr über ihre Interaktionen mit Proteinen und Membranen zu erfahren.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Sergey Shityakov
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-56960
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Fakultät für Biologie
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Institut für Virologie und Immunbiologie
Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Date of final exam:2011/06/01
Language:English
Year of Completion:2011
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
GND Keyword:Kohlenstoff; Nanoröhre; Retroviren; Proteine
Tag:virale Proteine
nanobiocomposites; retroviral proteins
Release Date:2011/06/06
Advisor:Prof. Dr. Thomas Dandekar
Licence (German):License LogoDeutsches Urheberrecht