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Novel Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Genotype ON1 Predominates in Germany during Winter Season 2012-13

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-115229
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization especially in young children with respiratory tract infections (RTI). Patterns of circulating RSV genotypes can provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of RSV infection. We retrospectively analyzed the genetic diversity of RSV infection in hospitalized children with acute RTI admitted to University Hospital Heidelberg/Germany between October 2012 and April 2013. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were routinely obtained in 240 children younger than 2Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization especially in young children with respiratory tract infections (RTI). Patterns of circulating RSV genotypes can provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of RSV infection. We retrospectively analyzed the genetic diversity of RSV infection in hospitalized children with acute RTI admitted to University Hospital Heidelberg/Germany between October 2012 and April 2013. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were routinely obtained in 240 children younger than 2 years of age who presented with clinical symptoms of upper or lower RTI. We analyzed NPAs via PCR and sequence analysis of the second variable region of the RSV G gene coding for the attachment glycoprotein. We obtained medical records reviewing routine clinical data. RSV was detected in 134/240 children. In RSV-positive patients the most common diagnosis was bronchitis/bronchiolitis (75.4%). The mean duration of hospitalization was longer in RSV-positive compared to RSV-negative patients (3.5 vs. 5.1 days; p < 0.01). RSV-A was detected in 82.1%, RSV-B in 17.9% of all samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 112 isolates revealed that the majority of RSV-A strains (65%) belonged to the novel ON1 genotype containing a 72-nucleotide duplication. However, genotype ON1 was not associated with a more severe course of illness when taking basic clinical/laboratory parameters into account. Molecular characterization of RSV confirms the co-circulation of multiple genotypes of subtype RSV-A and RSV-B. The duplication in the G gene of genotype ON1 might have an effect on the rapid spread of this emerging RSV strain.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Julia Tabatabai, Christiane Prifert, Johannes Pfeil, Juergen Grulich-Henn, Paul Schnitzler
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-115229
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Institut für Virologie und Immunbiologie
Language:English
Parent Title (English):PLOS ONE
Year of Completion:2014
Volume:9
Issue:10
Pagenumber:e109191
Source:PLoS ONE 9(10): e109191. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109191
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0109191
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=25290155
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Tag:60-nucleotide duplication; South Africa; attachment glycoprotein; circulation patterns; genetic variability; group B genotype; group-A; molecular characterization; phylogenetic analysis; subgroup-B
Release Date:2015/07/11
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung