• search hit 1 of 1
Back to Result List

Eye structure, activity rhythms, and visually-driven behavior are tuned to visual niche in ants

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-119595
  • Insects have evolved physiological adaptations and behavioral strategies that allow them to cope with a broad spectrum of environmental challenges and contribute to their evolutionary success. Visual performance plays a key role in this success. Correlates between life style and eye organization have been reported in various insect species. Yet, if and how visual ecology translates effectively into different visual discrimination and learning capabilities has been less explored. Here we report results from optical and behavioral analysesInsects have evolved physiological adaptations and behavioral strategies that allow them to cope with a broad spectrum of environmental challenges and contribute to their evolutionary success. Visual performance plays a key role in this success. Correlates between life style and eye organization have been reported in various insect species. Yet, if and how visual ecology translates effectively into different visual discrimination and learning capabilities has been less explored. Here we report results from optical and behavioral analyses performed in two sympatric ant species, Formica cunicularia and Camponotus aethiops. We show that the former are diurnal while the latter are cathemeral. Accordingly, F. cunicularia workers present compound eyes with higher resolution, while C. aethiops workers exhibit eyes with lower resolution but higher sensitivity. The discrimination and learning of visual stimuli differs significantly between these species in controlled dual-choice experiments: discrimination learning of small-field visual stimuli is achieved by F. cunicularia but not by C. aethiops, while both species master the discrimination of large-field visual stimuli. Our work thus provides a paradigmatic example about how timing of foraging activities and visual environment match the organization of compound eyes and visually-driven behavior. This correspondence underlines the relevance of an ecological/evolutionary framework for analyses in behavioral neuroscience.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author: Ayse Yilmaz, Volkan Aksoy, Yilmaz Camlitepe, Martin Giurfa
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-119595
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Year of Completion:2014
Volume:8
Pagenumber:205
Source:Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 8:205. doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00205
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00205
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=24982621
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 59 Tiere (Zoologie) / 595 Arthropoden (Gliederfüßer)
Tag:activity rhythm; ant; camponotus aethiops; compound eye; formica cunicularia; visual learning
Release Date:2015/11/11
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung