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Anemomenotactic orientation in beetles and scorpions

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-78118
  • Scorpions, living in North African semideserts are - in spite of disrupting experimental interferences - able to maintain a certain direction in their natural environment in the dark on a plane surface. Under comparable laboratory conditions, excluding the possibility of light or gravity orientation, they can orient themselves if a directed air current passes over the "arena." In most cases the scorpions do not run necessarily with or against the wind, but rather maintain constant angles to the air current for anywhere from minutes to manyScorpions, living in North African semideserts are - in spite of disrupting experimental interferences - able to maintain a certain direction in their natural environment in the dark on a plane surface. Under comparable laboratory conditions, excluding the possibility of light or gravity orientation, they can orient themselves if a directed air current passes over the "arena." In most cases the scorpions do not run necessarily with or against the wind, but rather maintain constant angles to the air current for anywhere from minutes to many hours. They are running anemomenotactically (ref. 1). Under identical conditions many species of beetles also orient themselves to air currents (refs. 2 to 4). The main problems to be solved in the study of anemomenotactic orientation are: (1) Which physical qualities of the air current have an influence on the anemomenotaxis? (2) With which sense organs do beetles and scorpions perceive wind directions? (3) Which physiological mechanism is the basis of anemomenotactic orientation? (4) What is the biological significance of anemomenotaxis in beetles and scorpions? With respect to these problems, more study has been done on beetles than on scorpions. Therefore, due to lack of space, I shall discuss mainly some of the results obtained in experiments with dung beetles (Geotrupes silvaticus, G. ,Stercorarius, G. armifrons, G. niger, Scarabaeus variolosus) and tenebrionid beetles (Tenebrio molitor, Pimelia grossa, P. tenuicomis, Scaurus dubius).show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Karl Eduard Linsenmair
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-78118
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Year of Completion:1972
Source:In: NASA Technical documents (1972) 1, S. 501 - 510.
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 59 Tiere (Zoologie) / 590 Tiere (Zoologie)
GND Keyword:Biologie
Tag:Käfer; Skorpion
Release Date:2013/06/11
Licence (German):License LogoDeutsches Urheberrecht