The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 24 of 659
Back to Result List

Temporal organization in \(Camponotus\) \(ants\): endogenous clocks and zeitgebers responsible for synchronization of task-related circadian rhythms in foragers and nurses

Zeitliche Organisation bei Camponotus-Ameisen: innere Uhren und die verantwortlichen Zeitgeber für die Synchronisation von Aufgaben-bezogenen circadianen Rhythmen von Fourageuren und Brutpflegerinnen

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-149382
  • The rotation of the earth around its axis causes recurring and predictable changes in the environment. To anticipate those changes and adapt their physiology and behavior accordingly, most organisms possess an endogenous clock. The presence of such a clock has been demonstrated for several ant species including Camponotus ants, but its involvement in the scheduling of daily activities within and outside the ant nest is fairly unknown. Timing of individual behaviors and synchronization among individuals is needed to generate a coordinatedThe rotation of the earth around its axis causes recurring and predictable changes in the environment. To anticipate those changes and adapt their physiology and behavior accordingly, most organisms possess an endogenous clock. The presence of such a clock has been demonstrated for several ant species including Camponotus ants, but its involvement in the scheduling of daily activities within and outside the ant nest is fairly unknown. Timing of individual behaviors and synchronization among individuals is needed to generate a coordinated collective response and to maintain colony function. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the presence of a circadian clock in different worker castes, and to determine the daily timing of their behavioral tasks within the colonies of two nectar-collecting Camponotus species. In chapter I, I describe the general temporal organization of work throughout the worker life in the species Camponotus rufipes. Continuous tracking of behavioral activity of individually- marked workers for up to 11 weeks in subcolonies revealed an age-dependent division of labor between interior and exterior workers. After eclosion, the fairly immobile young ants were frequently nurtured by older nurses, yet they started nursing the brood themselves within the first 48 hours of their life. Only 60% of workers switched to foraging at an age range of one to two weeks, likely because of the reduced needs within the small scale of the subcolonies. Not only the transition rates varied between subcolonies, but also the time courses of the task sequences between workers did, emphasizing the timed allocation of workers to different tasks in response to colony needs. Most of the observed foragers were present outside the nest only during the night, indicating a distinct timing of this behavioral activity on a daily level as well. As food availability, humidity and temperature levels were kept constant throughout the day, the preference for nocturnal activity seems to be endogenous and characteristic for C. rufipes. The subsequent monitoring of locomotor activity of workers taken from the subcolonies revealed the presence of a functional endogenous clock already in one-day old ants. As some nurses displayed activity rhythms in phase with the foraging rhythm, a synchronization of these in-nest workers by social interactions with exterior workers can be hypothesized. Do both castes use their endogenous clock to schedule their daily activities within the colony? In chapter II, I analyzed behavioral activity of C. rufipes foragers and nurses within the social context continuously for 24 hours. As time-restricted access to food sources may be one factor affecting daily activities of ants under natural conditions, I confronted subcolonies with either daily pulses of food availability or ad libitum feeding. Under nighttime and ad libitum feeding, behavioral activity of foragers outside the nest was predominantly nocturnal, confirming the results from the simple counting of exterior workers done in chapter I. Foragers switched to diurnality during daytime feeding, demonstrating the flexible and adaptive timing of a daily behavior. Because they synchronized their activity with the short times of food availability, these workers showed high levels of inactivity. Nurses, in contrast, were active all around the clock independent of the feeding regime, spending their active time largely with feeding and licking the brood. After the feeding pulses, however, a short bout of activity was observed in nurses. During this time period, both castes increasingly interacted via trophallaxis within the nest. With this form of social zeitgeber, exterior workers were able to entrain in-nest workers, a phenomenon observed already in chapter I. Under the subsequent monitoring of locomotor activity under LD conditions the rhythmic workers of both castes were uniformly nocturnal independent of the feeding regime. This endogenous activity pattern displayed by both worker castes in isolation was modified in the social context in adaption to task demands. Chapter III focuses on the potential factors causing the observed plasticity of daily rhythms in the social context in the ant C. rufipes. As presence of brood and conspecifics are likely indicators of the social context, I tested the effect of these factors on the endogenous rhythms of otherwise isolated individuals. Even in foragers, the contact to brood triggered an arrhythmic activity pattern resembling the arrhythmic behavioral activity pattern seen in nurses within the social context. As indicated in chapter I and II, social interaction could be one crucial factor for the synchronization of in nest activities. When separate groups were entrained to phase-shifted light-dark-cycles and monitored afterwards under constant conditions in pairwise contact through a mesh partitioning, both individuals shifted parts of their activity towards the activity period of the conspecific. Both social cues modulated the endogenous rhythms of workers and contribute to the context dependent plasticity in ant colonies. Although most nursing activities are executed arrhythmically throughout the day (chapter II), previous studies reported rhythmic translocation events of the brood in Camponotus nurses. As this behavior favors brood development, the timing of the translocations within the dark nest seems to be crucial. In chapter IV, I tracked translocation activity of all nurses within subcolonies of C. mus. Under the confirmed synchronized conditions of a LD-cycle, the daily pattern of brood relocation was based on the rhythmic, alternating activity of subpopulations with preferred translocation direction either to the warm or to the cold part of the temperature gradient at certain times of the day. Although the social interaction after pulse feeding had noticeable effects on the in-nest activity in C. rufipes (chapter I and II), it was not sufficient to synchronize the brood translocation rhythm of C. mus under constant darkness (e.g. when other zeitgebers were absent). The free-running translocation activity in some nurses demonstrated nevertheless the involvement of an endogenous clock in this behavior, which could be entrained under natural conditions by other potential non-photic zeitgebers like temperature and humidity cycles. Daily cycling of temperature and humidity could not only be relevant for in-nest activities, but also for the foraging activity outside the nest. Chapter V focuses on the monitoring of field foraging rhythms in the sympatric species C. mus and C. rufipes in relation to abiotic factors. Although both species had comparable critical thermal limits in the laboratory, foragers in C. mus were strictly diurnal and therefore foraged under higher temperatures than the predominant nocturnal foragers in C. rufipes. Marking experiments in C. rufipes colonies with higher levels of diurnal activity revealed the presence of temporally specialized forager subpopulations. These results suggest the presence of temporal niches not only between the two Camponotus species, but as well between workers within colonies of the same species. In conclusion, the temporal organization in colonies of Camponotus ants involves not only the scheduling of tasks performed throughout the worker life, but also the precise timing of daily activities. The necessary endogenous clock is already functioning in all workers after eclosion. Whereas the light-dark cycle and food availability seem to be the prominent zeitgebers for foragers, nurses may rely more on non-photic zeitgeber like social interaction, temperature and humidity cycles.show moreshow less
  • Die Drehung der Erde um ihre eigene Achse erzeugt wiederkehrende und vorhersehbare Umweltschwankungen. Um diese Schwankungen zu antizipieren und Physiologie sowie Verhalten entsprechend anzupassen, besitzen fast alle Organismen eine innere Uhr. Bei einigen Ameisenarten, Camponotus Ameisen eingenommen, wurde die Präsenz einer inneren Uhr bereits bestätigt. Wie diese Uhr allerdings zur zeitlichen Abstimmung der Tagesaktivitäten innerhalb und außerhalb des Ameisennestes genutzt wird, war bis jetzt weitestgehend unbekannt. Für die KoordinationDie Drehung der Erde um ihre eigene Achse erzeugt wiederkehrende und vorhersehbare Umweltschwankungen. Um diese Schwankungen zu antizipieren und Physiologie sowie Verhalten entsprechend anzupassen, besitzen fast alle Organismen eine innere Uhr. Bei einigen Ameisenarten, Camponotus Ameisen eingenommen, wurde die Präsenz einer inneren Uhr bereits bestätigt. Wie diese Uhr allerdings zur zeitlichen Abstimmung der Tagesaktivitäten innerhalb und außerhalb des Ameisennestes genutzt wird, war bis jetzt weitestgehend unbekannt. Für die Koordination einer kollektiven Verhaltensantwort und die Aufrechterhaltung der Kolonie ist dabei nicht nur die zeitliche Steuerung vom Verhalten Einzelner notwendig, sondern auch eine Synchronisation zwischen den Arbeiterinnen. Das Ziel dieser Doktorarbeit war es, die mögliche Präsenz einer inneren Uhr in verschiedenen Arbeiterkasten zu untersuchen, und die zeitliche Koordination von Tagesaktivitäten dieser Kasten innerhalb der Kolonien zweier Camponotus Ameisenarten zu bestimmen. In Kapitel I beschreibe ich die grundlegende zeitliche Organisation der Arbeitsteilung im Laufe des Arbeiterinnenlebens in der Art Camponotus rufipes. Mithilfe einer lückenlosen Verfolgung der Tagesaktivitäten von individuell markierten Tieren in Subkolonien über bis zu 11 Wochen konnte eine altersabhängige Arbeitsteilung zwischen Innen- und Außendienstarbeiterinnen nachgewiesen werden. Nach dem Schlüpfen wurden die eher unbeweglichen jungen Ameisen oft durch ältere Brutpflegerinnen versorgt, engagierten sich dann aber schon innerhalb der ersten 48 Stunden ihres Lebens selbst in der Brutpflege. Wahrscheinlich wegen der verminderten Notwendigkeit zur ausgedehnten Futtersuche innerhalb der kleinen Versuchskolonien wechselten nur 60% der Innendienstarbeiterinnen nach ein bis zwei Wochen zum Fouragieren außerhalb der Kolonie. Nicht nur variierte der Prozentsatz des Verhaltensübergangs von Brutpflegerin zur Sammlerin zwischen den Subkolonien, sondern auch innerhalb der Subkolonien unterschieden sich Arbeiterinnen im Zeitverlauf der Aufgabenfolge. Diese Ergebnisse betonen die gezielte, zeitliche Zuweisung von Arbeiterinnen zu einer bestimmten Arbeiterkaste je nach Bedarf der Kolonie. In diesem Experiment waren die Sammlerinnen vorwiegend nur während der Nachtphase außerhalb der Kolonie aktiv, was wiederum eine genaue zeitliche Koordination des Sammelverhaltens auf Tagesbasis zeigt. Da die Futterverfügbarkeit sowie Temperatur- und Luftfeuchte über den Tag hinweg konstant gehalten wurden, scheint die bevorzugte Nachtaktivität endogen und charakteristisch für C. rufipes zu sein. Durch das anschließende Monitoring der Lokomotoraktivität von Arbeiterinnen aus diesen Subkolonien konnte gezeigt werden, dass schon einen Tag alte Ameisen eine funktionierende innere Uhr besitzen. Der Aktivitätsrhythmus mancher Brutpflegerinnen war dabei in Phase mit dem Sammelrhythmus der Kolonie, weswegen man von einer Synchronisation dieser Inndienstarbeiterinnen durch soziale Interaktion mit Außendienstarbeiterinnen ausgehen kann. Doch nutzen beide Kasten ihre innere Uhr auch, um ihre Tagesaktivitäten innerhalb der Kolonie zeitlich abzustimmen? In Kapitel II habe ich die Verhaltensaktivität von C. rufipes Futtersammlerinnen und Brutpflegerinnen in ihrem sozialen Umfeld kontinuierlich für 24 Stunden verfolgt. Da der beschränkte Zugriff zu Futterquellen einer der Faktoren sein könnte, der die Tagesaktivitäten von Ameisen in der Natur beeinflusst, wurden Subkolonien entweder nur pulsartig oder ad libitum gefüttert. Während der Nacht- und ad libitum Fütterung waren Sammlerinnen vorwiegend nachtaktiv, was die Ergebnisse der simplen Zählung von Außendiensttieren in Kapitel I bestätigt. Während der Tagesfütterung wurden die Sammlerinnen tagaktiv, was die flexible und adaptive zeitliche Anpassung dieses täglichen Verhaltens veranschaulicht. Unabhängig von der Fütterungszeit waren Brutpflegerinnen rund um die Uhr aktiv, wobei sie die größte Zeit mit Fütterung und Säuberung der Brut verbrachten. Jedoch konnte kurz nach den Fütterungspulsen ein kurzer Aktivitätsanstieg verzeichnet werden, welcher auf die erhöhte Interaktion durch Trophallaxis mit den Sammlerinnen zurückzuführen ist. Wie bereits schon in Kapitel I angedeutet, können Außendiensttiere mithilfe dieses sozialen Zeitgebers Arbeiterinnen im Nest synchronisieren. Im anschließenden Monitoring der Lokomotoraktivität unter Licht-Dunkel-Bedingungen waren alle rhythmischen Arbeiterinnen einheitlich nachtaktiv, unabhängig von der vorausgegangen Fütterungszeit. Damit werden die endogenen Aktivitätsmuster, die beide Kasten in Isolation zeigen, im sozialen Kontext in Anpassung an die speziellen Anforderungen an die Kasten modifiziert. Schwerpunkt des Kapitels III ist die Untersuchung der potentiellen Faktoren, die die gezeigte Plastizität der Tagesrhythmen bei Ameisen der Art C. rufipes bedingen. Da unter anderem das Vorhandensein von Brut und Artgenossinnen sozialen Kontext signalisieren können, wurde der Effekt dieser Faktoren auf die endogenen Rhythmen von ansonsten isolierten Individuen untersucht. Selbst in Sammlerinnen verursachte der Kontakt zu Brut ein arrhythmisches Aktivitätsmuster, welches dem Verhaltensmuster von Brutpflegerinnen innerhalb der Kolonie gleicht. Wie schon in Kapitel I und II deutlich wurde, könnten soziale Interaktionen einen wesentlichen Beitrag zur Synchronisation der Nestaktivitäten leisten. Dazu wurden Gruppen getrennt voneinander mit phasenverschobenen Licht-Dunkel-Zyklen entraint, und Tiere anschließend in paarweisem Kontakt durch ein Netzgitter aufgezeichnet. Beide Individuen verschoben einen Teil ihrer Aktivität in die Aktivitätsperiode des Partners. Damit modulierten beide getesteten sozialen Faktoren die endogenen Rhythmen der Arbeiterinnen, was letztendlich zur kontextabhängigen Plastizität der Rhythmen in Ameisenkolonien beiträgt. Obwohl Brutpflegerinnen die meisten Verhaltensweisen arrhythmisch während des ganzen Tages ausüben (Kapitel II), zeigten vorangegangene Studien rhythmische Brutverlagerungen bei Brutpflegerinnen der Camponotus-Arten. Da dieses Verhalten die Brutentwicklung fördert, scheint das Timing der Verlagerungen innerhalb des ansonsten dunklen Nestes essentiell zu sein. In Kapitel IV verfolgte ich die Verlagerungsaktivität von allen Brutpflegerinnen in Subkolonien der Art C. mus. Unter den gesichert synchronisierten Bedingungen eines LD-Zykluses basierte das Brutverlagerungsmuster auf der rhythmischen, abwechselnden Aktivität von zwei Subpopulationen mit bevorzugter Verlagerungsrichtung in entweder den warmen oder kalten Bereich des Temperaturgradienten zu bestimmten Tageszeiten. Obwohl die soziale Interaktion nach Pulsfütterung einen deutlichen Einfluss auf die Nestaktivität bei C. rufipes hatte (Kapitel I und II), reichte diese Interaktion nicht aus um den Brutverlagerungsrhythmus bei C. mus innerhalb des dunklen Nests (d.h. unter Abwesenheit sonstiger Zeitgeber) zu synchronisieren. Nichtsdestotrotz zeigte der Freilauf der Brutverlagerungsrhythmen in einigen Brutpflegerinnen die Beteiligung einer inneren Uhr, welche durch anderweitige nicht-photische Zeitgeber wie Temperatur- und Feuchtigkeitszyklen synchronisiert werden könnte. Tageszyklen in Temperatur und Feuchtigkeit könnten nicht nur relevant sein für Aktivitäten innerhalb des Nests, sondern auch für die Fouragieraktivität außerhalb des Nests. In Kapitel V wurden Fouragierrhythmen im Freiland bei den sympatrisch vorkommenden Ameisenarten C. mus und C. rufipes in Abhängigkeit von abiotischen Faktoren betrachtet. Obwohl die beiden Arten unter Laborbedingungen ähnliche kritische Temperaturgrenzen aufzeigten, waren die Fourageure der Art C. mus strikt tagaktiv und sammelten deswegen unter höheren Temperaturen Futter als die vorwiegend nachtaktiven Fourageure der Art C. rufipes. Bei C. rufipes Kolonien mit erhöhter Tagaktivität wiesen Markierexperimente das Vorkommen von zeitlich spezialisierten Fourageur-Subpopulationen nach. Damit deuten die Ergebnisse nicht nur das Vorkommen von unterschiedlichen zeitlichen Nischen innerhalb der beiden Camponotus-Arten an, sondern auch zwischen Arbeiterinnen von Kolonien derselben Art. Zusammenfassend gesehen umspannt die zeitliche Organisation in Kolonien der Camponotus-Ameisen nicht nur die zeitliche Planung der Aufgaben, die über das Arbeiterinnenleben hinweg ausgeführt werden, sondern auch das genaue Terminierung von Tagesaktivitäten. Bereits nach dem Schlüpfen besitzen allen Arbeiterinnen eine funktionsfähige und für die zeitliche Organisation notwendige innere Uhr. Während der Licht-Dunkel-Zyklus und Futterverfügbarkeit die bedeutenden Zeitgeber für Fourageure zu sein scheinen, könnten Brutpflegerinnen eher auf nicht-photische Zeitgeber wie soziale Interaktion, Temperatur- und Feuchtigkeitszyklen angewiesen sein.show moreshow less
Metadaten
Author: Stephanie Mildner
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-149382
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Graduate Schools
Faculties:Graduate Schools / Graduate School of Life Sciences
Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Referee:Prof. Dr. Flavio Roces, Prof. Dr. Charlotte Förster, Dr. Christoph Kleineidam
Date of final exam:2017/05/22
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
GND Keyword:circadian clocks; behavioral rhythms; Camponotus; zeitgeber; division of labor
Tag:zeitliche Organisation
temporal organization
Release Date:2018/05/22
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-NC-ND: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Nicht kommerziell, Keine Bearbeitung