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Remote Sensing of River Delta Inundation: Exploiting the Potential of Coarse Spatial Resolution, Temporally-Dense MODIS Time Series

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-151552
  • River deltas belong to the most densely settled places on earth. Although they only account for 5% of the global land surface, over 550 million people live in deltas. These preferred livelihood locations, which feature flat terrain, fertile alluvial soils, access to fluvial and marine resources, a rich wetland biodiversity and other advantages are, however, threatened by numerous internal and external processes. Socio-economic development, urbanization, climate change induced sea level rise, as well as flood pulse changes due to upstream waterRiver deltas belong to the most densely settled places on earth. Although they only account for 5% of the global land surface, over 550 million people live in deltas. These preferred livelihood locations, which feature flat terrain, fertile alluvial soils, access to fluvial and marine resources, a rich wetland biodiversity and other advantages are, however, threatened by numerous internal and external processes. Socio-economic development, urbanization, climate change induced sea level rise, as well as flood pulse changes due to upstream water diversion all lead to changes in these highly dynamic systems. A thorough understanding of a river delta's general setting and intra-annual as well as long-term dynamic is therefore crucial for an informed management of natural resources. Here, remote sensing can play a key role in analyzing and monitoring these vast areas at a global scale. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the potential of intra-annual time series analyses at dense temporal, but coarse spatial resolution for inundation characterization in five river deltas located in four different countries. Based on 250 m MODIS reflectance data we analyze inundation dynamics in four densely populated Asian river deltas-namely the Yellow River Delta (China), the Mekong Delta (Vietnam), the Irrawaddy Delta (Myanmar), and the Ganges-Brahmaputra (Bangladesh, India)-as well as one very contrasting delta: the nearly uninhabited polar Mackenzie Delta Region in northwestern Canada for the complete time span of one year (2013). A complex processing chain of water surface derivation on a daily basis allows the generation of intra-annual time series, which indicate inundation duration in each of the deltas. Our analyses depict distinct inundation patterns within each of the deltas, which can be attributed to processes such as overland flooding, irrigation agriculture, aquaculture, or snowmelt and thermokarst processes. Clear differences between mid-latitude, subtropical, and polar deltas are illustrated, and the advantages and limitations of the approach for inundation derivation are discussed.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Claudia Kuenzer, Igor Klein, Tobias Ullmann, Efi Foufoula Georgiou, Roland Baumhauer, Stefan Dech
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-151552
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Philosophische Fakultät (Histor., philolog., Kultur- und geograph. Wissensch.) / Institut für Geographie und Geologie
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Remote Sensing
Year of Completion:2015
Volume:7
Source:Remote Sensing 2015, 7, 8516-8542. DOI: 10.3390/rs70708516
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/rs70708516
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 52 Astronomie / 526 Mathematische Geografie
Tag:ENVISAT ASAR WSM; SAR imagery; TerraSAR-X; central asia; difference water index; dynamics; flood detection; mangrove ecosystems; mekong delta; synthetic aperture radar
Release Date:2017/10/23
First Page:8516
Last Page:8542
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung 4.0 International