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Xiphophorus as an in vivo model for studies on oncogenes

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-86398
  • The capacity of Xiphophorus to develop neoplasia can be formally assigned to a "tumor gene" (Tu), which appears to be a normal part of the genome of all individuals. The wild fish have evolved population-specific and cell type-specific systems of regulatory genes (R) for Tu that protect the fish from neoplasia. Hybridization of members of different wild populations in the laborstory followed by treatment of the hybrids with carcinogens led to disintegration of the R systems permitting excessive expression of Tu and thus resulting in neoplasia.The capacity of Xiphophorus to develop neoplasia can be formally assigned to a "tumor gene" (Tu), which appears to be a normal part of the genome of all individuals. The wild fish have evolved population-specific and cell type-specific systems of regulatory genes (R) for Tu that protect the fish from neoplasia. Hybridization of members of different wild populations in the laborstory followed by treatment of the hybrids with carcinogens led to disintegration of the R systems permitting excessive expression of Tu and thus resulting in neoplasia. Certain hybrids developed neoplasia even spontaneously. Observations on the genuine phenotypic effect of the derepressed Tu in the early embryo indicated an essential normal function of this oncogene in cell differentiation, proliferation and cell-cell communication. Tu appeared to be indispensable in the genome but may also be present in accessory copics. Recently, c-src, the cellular homolog of the Rous sarcoma virus oncogene v-src, was detected in Xiphophorus. The protein product of c-src, pp60c-src, was identified and then examined by its associated kinase activity. This pp60c-src was found in all individuals tested, but, depending on the genotype, its kinase activity was different. The genetic characters of c-src, such as linkage relations, dosage relations, expression, etc., correspond to those of Tu. From a systematic study which showed that pp60c-src was present in all metazoa tested ranging from mammals down to sponges, we concluded that c-src has evolved with the multicellular organization of animals. Neoplasia of animals and humans is a characteristic closely related to this evolution. Our data showed that small aquariurn fish, besides being used successfully because they are time-, space-, and money-saving systems for carcinogenicity testing, are also highly suitable for basic studies on neoplasia at the populational, morphological, developmental, cell biological, and molecular levels.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Fritz Anders, Manfred Schartl, Angelika Barnekow
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-86398
Document Type:Conference Proceeding
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Year of Completion:1984
Source:In: Use of small fish species in carcinogenity testing / ed. Karen L. Hoover. - Bethesda, Md: US Dep. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health; 1984. - S. 97-109. - (National Cancer Institute <Bethesda, Md.>: Monographs ; 65)
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 54 Chemie / 540 Chemie und zugeordnete Wissenschaften
GND Keyword:Schwertkärpfling; In vivo; Onkogen
Release Date:2014/06/12
Licence (German):License LogoDeutsches Urheberrecht