The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 43 of 659
Back to Result List

Timing of colony phenology and foraging activity in honey bees

Zeitliche Koordination von Koloniephänologie und Sammelaktivität bei Honigbienen

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-155105
  • I. Timing is a crucial feature in organisms that live within a variable and changing environment. Complex mechanisms to measure time are wide-spread and were shown to exist in many taxa. These mechanisms are expected to provide fitness benefits by enabling organisms to anticipate environmental changes and adapt accordingly. However, very few studies have addressed the adaptive value of proper timing. The objective of this PhD-project was to investigate mechanisms and fitness consequences of timing decisions concerning colony phenology andI. Timing is a crucial feature in organisms that live within a variable and changing environment. Complex mechanisms to measure time are wide-spread and were shown to exist in many taxa. These mechanisms are expected to provide fitness benefits by enabling organisms to anticipate environmental changes and adapt accordingly. However, very few studies have addressed the adaptive value of proper timing. The objective of this PhD-project was to investigate mechanisms and fitness consequences of timing decisions concerning colony phenology and foraging activity in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), a social insect species with a high degree of social organization and one of the most important pollinators of wild plants and crops. In chapter II, a study is presented that aimed to identify the consequences of disrupted synchrony between colony phenology and the local environment by manipulating the timing of brood onset after hibernation. In a follow-up experiment, the importance of environmental factors for the timing of brood onset was investigated to assess the potential of climate change to disrupt synchronization of colony phenology (Chapter III). Chapter IV aimed to prove for the first time that honey bees can use interval time-place learning to improve foraging activity in a variable environment. Chapter V investigates the fitness benefits of information exchange between nest mates via waggle dance communication about a resource environment that is heterogeneous in space and time. II. In the study presented in chapter II, the importance of the timing of brood onset after hibernation as critical point in honey bee colony phenology in temperate zones was investigated. Honey bee colonies were overwintered at two climatically different sites. By translocating colonies from each site to the other in late winter, timing of brood onset was manipulated and consequently colony phenology was desynchronized with the local environment. Delaying colony phenology in respect to the local environment decreased the capability of colonies to exploit the abundant spring bloom. Early brood onset, on the other hand, increased the loads of the brood parasite Varroa destructor later in the season with negative impact on colony worker population size. This indicates a timing related trade-off and illustrates the importance of investigating effects of climate change on complex multi-trophic systems. It can be concluded that timing of brood onset in honey bees is an important fitness relevant step for colony phenology that is highly sensitive to climatic conditions in late winter. Further, phenology shifts and mismatches driven by climate change can have severe fitness consequences. III. In chapter III, I assess the importance of the environmental factors ambient temperature and photoperiod as well as elapsed time on the timing of brood onset. Twenty-four hibernating honey bee colonies were placed into environmental chambers and allocated to different combinations of two temperature regimes and three different light regimes. Brood onset was identified non-invasively by tracking comb temperature within the winter cluster. The experiment revealed that ambient temperature plays a major role in the timing of brood onset, but the response of honey bee colonies to temperature increases is modified by photoperiod. Further, the data indicate the involvement of an internal clock. I conclude that the timing of brood onset is complex but probably highly susceptible to climate change and especially spells of warm weather in winter. IV. In chapter IV, it was examined if honey bees are capable of interval time-place learning and if this ability improves foraging efficiency in a dynamic resource environment. In a field experiment with artificial feeders, foragers were able to learn time intervals and use this ability to anticipate time periods during which feeders were active. Further, interval time-place learning enabled foragers to increase nectar uptake rates. It was concluded that interval time-place learning can help honey bee foragers to adapt to the complex and variable temporal patterns of floral resource environments. V. The study presented in chapter V identified the importance of the honey bee waggle dance communication for the spatiotemporal coordination of honey bee foraging activity in resource environments that can vary from day to day. Consequences of disrupting the instructional component of honey bee dance communication were investigated in eight temperate zone landscapes with different levels of spatiotemporal complexity. While nectar uptake of colonies was not affected, waggle dance communication significantly benefitted pollen harvest irrespective of landscape complexity. I suggest that this is explained by the fact that honey bees prefer to forage pollen in semi-natural habitats, which provide diverse resource species but are sparse and presumably hard to find in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. I conclude that waggle dance communication helps to ensure a sufficient and diverse pollen diet which is crucial for honey bee colony health. VI. In my PhD-project, I could show that honey bee colonies are able to adapt their activities to a seasonally and daily changing environment, which affects resource uptake, colony development, colony health and ultimately colony fitness. Ongoing global change, however, puts timing in honey bee colonies at risk. Climate change has the potential to cause mismatches with the local resource environment. Intensivation of agricultural management with decreased resource diversity and short resource peaks in spring followed by distinctive gaps increases the probability of mismatches. Even the highly efficient foraging system of honey bees might not ensure a sufficiently diverse and healthy diet in such an environment. The global introduction of the parasitic mite V. destructor and the increased exposure to pesticides in intensively managed landscapes further degrades honey bee colony health. This might lead to reduced cognitive capabilities in workers and impact the communication and social organization in colonies, thereby undermining the ability of honey bee colonies to adapt to their environment.show moreshow less
  • I. Zeitliche Koordination ist äußerst wichtig für Organismen, die in einer variablen und sich wandelnden Umwelt leben. Komplexe Mechanismen, die das Messen von Zeit ermöglichen, sind weit verbreitet und wurden bei vielen Taxa aufgezeigt. Es wird generell angenommen, dass diese Mechanismen Fitnessvorteile verschaffen, indem sie es Organismen ermöglichen, Umweltveränderungen vorherzusehen und sich entsprechen anzupassen. Allerdings gibt es bisher nur sehr wenige Studien zum adaptiven Wert einer guten zeitlichen Koordination. Ziel diesesI. Zeitliche Koordination ist äußerst wichtig für Organismen, die in einer variablen und sich wandelnden Umwelt leben. Komplexe Mechanismen, die das Messen von Zeit ermöglichen, sind weit verbreitet und wurden bei vielen Taxa aufgezeigt. Es wird generell angenommen, dass diese Mechanismen Fitnessvorteile verschaffen, indem sie es Organismen ermöglichen, Umweltveränderungen vorherzusehen und sich entsprechen anzupassen. Allerdings gibt es bisher nur sehr wenige Studien zum adaptiven Wert einer guten zeitlichen Koordination. Ziel dieses Dissertations-Projekts war es, Mechanismen der zeitlichen Koordination bei Honigbienen (Apis mellifera) zu erforschen und deren Bedeutung für die Fitness des Honigbienenvolks zu identifizieren. In Kapitel II präsentiere ich meine Studie über die Konsequenzen eines falsch gewählten Zeitpunkts für den Brutbeginn am Ende des Winters und der daraus folgenden gestörten Synchronisation zwischen der Phänologie von Honigbienenvölkern und der lokalen Umwelt. In einem Folgeexperiment wurde die Bedeutung von Umweltfaktoren für das Timing des Brutbeginns untersucht (Kapitel III). Die Studie in Kapitel IV zielt darauf ab, erstmalig den Beweis zu erbringen, dass Honigbienen das „Intervall time-place learning“, d.h. die Fähigkeit, Zeitintervalle zwischen Ereignissen zu lernen und mit deren räumlichen Lage zu assoziieren, beherrschen und, dass diese Fähigkeit beim Sammeln von Ressourcen vorteilhaft ist. Kapitel V untersucht die Fitnessvorteile, die aus dem Austausch von Informationen über ein raumzeitlich heterogenes Ressourcenumfeld zwischen Stockgenossinnen mit Hilfe des Schwänzeltanzes gezogen werden. II. In der Studie, die in Kapitel II präsentiert wird, wurde die Bedeutung des Brutbeginns als entscheidender Punkt für die Phänologie von Honigbienenvölkern in den gemäßigten Breiten untersucht. Honigbienenvölker wurden an zwei klimatisch unterschiedlichen Standorten überwintert. Indem ein Teil der Völker im Spätwinter zwischen den Standorten ausgetauscht wurde, wurde deren Brutbeginn manipuliert und dadurch die Phänologie bezüglich der lokalen Umwelt desynchronisiert. Das verzögern der Phänologie der Völker verminderte deren Fähigkeit die üppige Frühjahrsblüte zu nutzen. Ein früher Brutbeginn andererseits erhöhte die Belastung der Völker durch den Brutparasiten Varroa destructor im Verlauf der Saison, was sich negativ auf die Menge der Arbeiterinnen im Volk auswirkte. Es gibt also entscheidende gegensätzlich wirkende Faktoren, die den optimalen Zeitpunkt des Brutbeginns bestimmen. Die Studie zeigt zudem warum es wichtig ist, die möglichen Folgen des Klimawandels in einem multitrophischen System zu betrachten statt sich auf einfache Interaktionen zu beschränken. Man kann allgemein folgern, dass das Timing des Brutbeginns einen bedeutenden fitnessrelevanten Schritt in der Phänologie von Honigbienenvölkern darstellt, der stark von klimatischen Bedingungen im Spätwinter beeinflusst wird. Verschiebungen und Fehlanpassungen des Brutbeginns, und damit der Phänologie, durch den Klimawandel können ernsthafte negative Konsequenzen für die Fitness von Honigbienenvölkern haben. III. In Kapitel III beleuchte ich die Bedeutung der Umweltfaktoren Umgebungstemperatur und Photoperiode sowie der verstrichenen Zeit auf das Timing des Brutbeginns. Vierundzwanzig überwinternde Honigbienenvölker wurden in Klimakammern untergebracht und auf sechs unterschiedliche Kombinationen von Temperatur- und Lichtregimes verteilt. Der Brutbeginn wurde nicht-invasiv über den Temperaturverlauf auf der Wabe innerhalb der Wintertraube festgestellt. Das Experiment hat gezeigt, dass die Umgebungstemperatur eine entscheidende Rolle beim Timing des Brutbeginns spielt. Allerdings wurde die Reaktion der Völker auf einen Temperaturanstieg vom jeweils vorherrschenden Lichtregime beeinflusst. Zudem deuten die Daten auf die Beteiligung einer inneren Uhr hin. Ich folgere, dass das Timing des Brutbeginns durch ein komplexes System geregelt wird, das wahrscheinlich anfällig für Einflüsse durch den Klimawandel und insbesondere durch Warmwetterphasen im Winter ist. IV. In Kapitel IV meiner Dissertation wird eine Studie präsentiert, die untersucht ob Bienen die Befähigung zum „Intervall time-place learning“ besitzen und ob diese Fähigkeit die Sammeleffizienz in einem dynamischen Ressourcenumfeld verbessert. In einer Feldstudie mit künstlichen Futterquellen zeigten Sammelbienen, dass sie in der Lage waren, Zeitintervalle zu lernen und das Wissen zu nutzen, um die Zeiten vorherzusehen zu denen die Futterquellen aktiv waren. Dieses Lernverhalten ermöglichte es den Sammelbienen, ihre Nektaraufnahmerate zu steigern. Es wurde gefolgert, dass „Intervall time-place learning“ Sammelbienen dabei helfen kann, sich in einem Blühressourcenumfeld mit komplexen und variablen Zeitmustern zurechtzufinden. V. Diese Studie, die in Kapitel V präsentiert wird, untersuchte die Bedeutung der Schwänzeltanzkommunikation der Honigbienen für die raumzeitliche Koordination der Sammelaktivität des Volkes innerhalb eines Ressourcenumfelds, das täglich variieren kann. Die Folgen der Störung der instruktiven Komponenten des Schwänzeltanzes wurden in acht unterschiedlich komplex strukturierten Landschaften innerhalb der gemäßigten Breiten ermessen. Während kein Einfluss auf den Nektarsammelerfolg festgestellt werden konnte, wurde jedoch gezeigt, dass der Pollensammelerfolg, unabhängig von der raumzeitlichen Komplexität der Landschaft, stark von der Schwänzeltanzkommunikation profitiert. Der Grund dafür liegt vermutlich darin, dass Honigbienen vorzugsweise Pollen in halbnatürlichen Habitaten sammeln, die eine hohe Ressourcenvielfalt bieten, aber in intensiv agrarwirtschaftlich genutzten Landschaften eher selten und relativ schwer zu finden sind. Die Studie lässt schließen, dass die Schwänzeltanzkommunikation dabei hilft, eine ausreichende und diverse Pollenernährung zu gewährleisten und damit eine große Rolle für die Gesundheit von Honigbienenvölkern spielt. VI. Ich konnte in meinem Dissertationsprojekt zeigen, dass Honigbienen in der Lage sind ihre Aktivitäten an eine sich jahreszeitlich und täglich verändernde Umwelt anzupassen. Eine gute zeitliche Koordination hat Einfluss auf Sammelerfolg, Volksentwicklung, Gesundheit und letztlich auf die Fitness des Volkes. Allerdings gefährdet der voranschreitende globale Wandel die zeitliche Koordination der Honigbienenvölker. Der Klimawandel hat das Potenzial, zeitliche Anpassungen an die lokale Umwelt zu stören. Die Intensivierung der Landwirtschaft und der damit einhergehende Verlust von Pflanzenvielfalt sowie die kurzen Zeiträume von extrem hohem Ressourcenangebot, gefolgt von einer ausgeprägten Blühlücke, erhöht die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass zeitlich Fehlanpassungen auftreten. In einer derartigen Umwelt könnte selbst das höchst effiziente Ressourcensammelsystem der Honigbienen nicht mehr genügen, um eine ausreichende, vielfältige und gesunde Ernährung zu gewährleisten. Die globale Verbreitung der parasitischen Varroamilbe durch den Menschen und die erhöhte Belastung durch Pestizide verschlechtert zusätzlich den Gesundheitszustand der Honigbienen. Das wiederum kann sich negativ auf das Lernvermögen und des Weiteren auf die Kommunikation und soziale Organisation der Völker auswirken und dadurch deren Fähigkeit, sich an eine veränderliche Umwelt anzupassen unterwandern.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author: Fabian NürnbergerORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-155105
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Granting Institution:Universität Würzburg, Graduate Schools
Faculties:Graduate Schools / Graduate School of Life Sciences
Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Referee:Prof. Dr. Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, PD Dr. Johannes Spaethe, Dr. Stephan Härtel
Date of final exam:2017/11/23
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Sonstige beteiligte Institutionen:Lehrstuhl für Tierökologie und Tropenbiologie, Universität Würzburg
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 577 Ökologie
GND Keyword:Biene; Phänologie; Kommunikation; Soziale Insekten
Tag:Timing
Apis mellifera; brood rearing; climate change; foraging; hibernation; temperate zones; varroa; waggle dance
Release Date:2018/12/07
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-SA: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 4.0 International