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Transcriptomics of two evolutionary novelties: how to make a sperm-transfer organ out of an anal fin and a sexually selected "sword" out of a caudal fin

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-144139
  • Swords are exaggerated male ornaments of swordtail fishes that have been of great interest to evolutionary biologists ever since Darwin described them in the Descent of Man (1871). They are a novel sexually selected trait derived from modified ventral caudal fin rays and are only found in the genus Xiphophorus. Another phylogenetically more widespread and older male trait is the gonopodium, an intromittent organ found in all poeciliid fishes, that is derived from a modified anal fin. Despite many evolutionary and behavioral studies on bothSwords are exaggerated male ornaments of swordtail fishes that have been of great interest to evolutionary biologists ever since Darwin described them in the Descent of Man (1871). They are a novel sexually selected trait derived from modified ventral caudal fin rays and are only found in the genus Xiphophorus. Another phylogenetically more widespread and older male trait is the gonopodium, an intromittent organ found in all poeciliid fishes, that is derived from a modified anal fin. Despite many evolutionary and behavioral studies on both traits, little is known so far about the molecular mechanisms underlying their development. By investigating transcriptomic changes (utilizing a RNA-Seq approach) in response to testosterone treatment in the swordtail fish, Xiphophorus hellerii, we aimed to better understand the architecture of the gene regulatory networks underpinning the development of these two evolutionary novelties. Large numbers of genes with tissue-specific expression patterns were identified. Among the sword genes those involved in embryonic organ development, sexual character development and coloration were highly expressed, while in the gonopodium rather more morphogenesis-related genes were found. Interestingly, many genes and genetic pathways are shared between both developing novel traits derived from median fins: the sword and the gonopodium. Our analyses show that a larger set of gene networks was co-opted during the development and evolution of the older gonopodium than in the younger, and morphologically less complex trait, the sword. We provide a catalog of candidate genes for future efforts to dissect the development of those sexually selected exaggerated male traits in swordtails.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Ji Hyoun Kang, Tereza Manousaki, Paolo Franchini, Susanne Kneitz, Manfred Schartl, Axel Meyer
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-144139
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Ecology and Evolution
Year of Completion:2015
Volume:5
Issue:4
Pagenumber:848-864
Source:Ecology and Evolution 5:4, 848-864 (2015). DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1390
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1390
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Tag:Co-option; Drosophila melanogaster; RNA-Seq; Xiphophorus; beetle horns; cell proliferation; expression analysis; fishes Xiphophorus; genus Xiphophorus; gonopodium; hybrid origin; key innovation; male-specific traits; mouse testis differentiation; preexisting bias; sex combs; swordtails
Release Date:2018/06/20
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung 4.0 International