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Population-specific effects of developmental temperature on body condition and jumping performance of a widespread European frog

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-164960
  • All physiological processes of ectotherms depend on environmental temperature. Thus, adaptation of physiological mechanisms to the thermal environments is important for achieving optimal performance and fitness. The European Common Frog, Rana temporaria, is widely distributed across different thermal habitats. This makes it an exceptional model for studying the adaptations to different thermal conditions. We raised tadpoles from Germany and Croatia at two constant temperature treatments (15°C, 20°C), and under natural temperature fluctuationsAll physiological processes of ectotherms depend on environmental temperature. Thus, adaptation of physiological mechanisms to the thermal environments is important for achieving optimal performance and fitness. The European Common Frog, Rana temporaria, is widely distributed across different thermal habitats. This makes it an exceptional model for studying the adaptations to different thermal conditions. We raised tadpoles from Germany and Croatia at two constant temperature treatments (15°C, 20°C), and under natural temperature fluctuations (in outdoor treatments), and tested how different developmental temperatures affected developmental traits, that is, length of larval development, morphometrics, and body condition, as well as jumping performance of metamorphs. Our results revealed population‐specific differences in developmental time, body condition, and jumping performance. Croatian frogs developed faster in all treatments, were heavier, in better body condition, and had longer hind limbs and better jumping abilities than German metamorphs. The populations further differed in thermal sensitivity of jumping performance. While metamorphs from Croatia increased their jumping performance with higher temperatures, German metamorphs reached their performance maximum at lower temperatures. These population‐specific differences in common environments indicate local genetic adaptation, with southern populations being better adapted to higher temperatures than those from north of the Alps.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Sanja Drakulić, Heike Feldhaar, Duje Lisičić, Mia Mioč, Ivan Cizelj, Michael Seiler, Theresa Spatz, Mark-Oliver Rödel
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-164960
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Ecology and Evolution
Year of Completion:2016
Volume:6
Issue:10
Pagenumber:3115-3128
Source:Ecology and Evolution 2016; 6(10): 3115–3128
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2113
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Tag:Amphibians; ectotherms; physiological traits; plasticity; thermal adaptation
Release Date:2020/03/17
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung