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Landscape simplification filters species traits and drives biotic homogenization

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-141925
  • Biodiversity loss can affect the viability of ecosystems by decreasing the ability of communities to respond to environmental change and disturbances. Agricultural intensification is a major driver of biodiversity loss and has multiple components operating at different spatial scales: from in-field management intensity to landscape-scale simplification. Here we show that landscape-level effects dominate functional community composition and can even buffer the effects of in-field management intensification on functional homogenization, and thatBiodiversity loss can affect the viability of ecosystems by decreasing the ability of communities to respond to environmental change and disturbances. Agricultural intensification is a major driver of biodiversity loss and has multiple components operating at different spatial scales: from in-field management intensity to landscape-scale simplification. Here we show that landscape-level effects dominate functional community composition and can even buffer the effects of in-field management intensification on functional homogenization, and that animal communities in real-world managed landscapes show a unified response (across orders and guilds) to both landscape-scale simplification and in-field intensification. Adults and larvae with specialized feeding habits, species with shorter activity periods and relatively small body sizes are selected against in simplified landscapes with intense in-field management. Our results demonstrate that the diversity of land cover types at the landscape scale is critical for maintaining communities, which are functionally diverse, even in landscapes where in-field management intensity is high.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Sagrario Gámez-Virués, David J. Perović, Martin M. Gossner, Carmen Börschig, Nico Blüthgen, Heike de Jong, Nadja K. Simons, Alexandra-Maria Klein, Jochen Krauss, Gwen Maier, Christoph Scherber, Juliane Steckel, Christoph Rothenwöhrer, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Christiane N. Weiner, Wolfgang Weisser, Michael Werner, Teja Tscharntke, Catrin Westphal
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-141925
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Nature Communications
Year of Completion:2015
Volume:6
Issue:8568
Source:Nature Communications 6:8568 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9568 (2015)
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms9568
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 578 Naturgeschichte von Organismen
Tag:agricultural intensification; biodiversity; body-size; butterflies; community functional-responses; diversity; heterogenity; land-use intensity; managed grasslands; sustainable intensification
Release Date:2016/12/16
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung