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The epidemiological impact of childhood influenza vaccination using live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany: predictions of a simulation study

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-117563
  • Background: Routine annual influenza vaccination is primarily recommended for all persons aged 60 and above and for people with underlying chronic conditions in Germany. Other countries have already adopted additional childhood influenza immunisation programmes. The objective of this study is to determine the potential epidemiological impact of implementing paediatric influenza vaccination using intranasally administered live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany. Methods: A deterministic age-structured model is used to simulate theBackground: Routine annual influenza vaccination is primarily recommended for all persons aged 60 and above and for people with underlying chronic conditions in Germany. Other countries have already adopted additional childhood influenza immunisation programmes. The objective of this study is to determine the potential epidemiological impact of implementing paediatric influenza vaccination using intranasally administered live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany. Methods: A deterministic age-structured model is used to simulate the population-level impact of different vaccination strategies on the transmission dynamics of seasonal influenza in Germany. In our base-case analysis, we estimate the effects of adding a LAIV-based immunisation programme targeting children 2 to 17 years of age to the existing influenza vaccination policy. The data used in the model is based on published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Results: In our model, additional vaccination of children 2 to 17 years of age with LAIV leads to the prevention of 23.9 million influenza infections and nearly 16 million symptomatic influenza cases within 10 years. This reduction in burden of disease is not restricted to children. About one third of all adult cases can indirectly be prevented by LAIV immunisation of children. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that vaccinating children 2-17 years of age is likely associated with a significant reduction in the burden of paediatric influenza. Furthermore, annual routine childhood vaccination against seasonal influenza is expected to decrease the incidence of influenza among adults and older people due to indirect effects of herd protection. In summary, our model provides data supporting the introduction of a paediatric influenza immunisation programme in Germany.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Markus A. Rose, Oliver Damm, Wolfgang Greiner, Markus Knuf, Peter Wutzler, Johannes G. Liese, Hagen Krüger, Ulrich Wahn, Tom Schaberg, Markus Schwehm, Thomas F. Kochmann, Martin Eichner
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-117563
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Kinderklinik und Poliklinik
Language:English
Parent Title (English):BMC Infectious Diseases
ISSN:1471-2334
Year of Completion:2014
Volume:14
Issue:40
Source:BMC Infectious Diseases 2014 14:40. doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-40
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-14-40
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=24450996
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Tag:Germany; United States; burden; children; disease; efficacy; hospitalizations; infection; influenza; live-attenuated influenza vaccine; metanalysis; recommendations; seasonal influenza; transmission model; vaccination; young children
Release Date:2015/08/24
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung