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Lu/BCAM Adhesion Glycoprotein Is a Receptor for Escherichia coli Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1)

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-117987
  • The Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) is a protein toxin which is a major virulence factor of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Here, we identified the Lutheran (Lu) adhesion glycoprotein/basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) as cellular receptor for CNF1 by co-precipitation of cell surface molecules with tagged toxin. The CNF1-Lu/BCAM interaction was verified by direct protein-protein interaction analysis and competition studies. These studies revealed amino acids 720 to 1014 of CNF1 as the binding site for Lu/BCAM. We suggest two cellThe Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) is a protein toxin which is a major virulence factor of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Here, we identified the Lutheran (Lu) adhesion glycoprotein/basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) as cellular receptor for CNF1 by co-precipitation of cell surface molecules with tagged toxin. The CNF1-Lu/BCAM interaction was verified by direct protein-protein interaction analysis and competition studies. These studies revealed amino acids 720 to 1014 of CNF1 as the binding site for Lu/BCAM. We suggest two cell interaction sites in CNF1: first the N-terminus, which binds to p37LRP as postulated before. Binding of CNF1 to p37LRP seems to be crucial for the toxin's action. However, it is not sufficient for the binding of CNF1 to the cell surface. A region directly adjacent to the catalytic domain is a high affinity interaction site for Lu/BCAM. We found Lu/BCAM to be essential for the binding of CNF1 to cells. Cells deficient in Lu/BCAM but expressing p37LRP could not bind labeled CNF1. Therefore, we conclude that LRP and Lu/BCAM are both required for toxin action but with different functions. Author Summary We study a crucial virulence factor produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli strains, the Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1). More than 80% of urinary tract infections (UTIs), which are counted among the most common bacterial infections of humans, are caused by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. We and others elucidated the molecular mechanism of the E. coli toxin CNF1. It constitutively activates Rho GTPases by a direct covalent modification. The toxin enters mammalian cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here, we identified the protein receptor for CNF1 by co-precipitation of cell surface molecules with the tagged toxin and subsequent Maldi-TOF analysis. We identified the Lutheran (Lu) adhesion glycoprotein/basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) as receptor for CNF1 and located its interaction site to the C-terminal part of the toxin. We performed direct protein-protein interaction analysis and competition studies. Moreover, cells deficient in Lu/BCAM could not bind labeled CNF1. The identification of a toxin's cellular receptor and receptor binding region is an important task for understanding the pathogenic function of the toxin and, moreover, to make the toxin accessible for its use as a cellbiological and pharmacological tool, for example for the generation of immunotoxins.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Marianne Piteau, Panagiotis Papatheodorou, Carsten Schwan, Andreas Schlosser, Klaus Aktories, Gudula Schmidt
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-117987
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum
Language:English
Parent Title (English):PLoS Pathogens
ISSN:1553-7374
Year of Completion:2014
Volume:10
Issue:1
Pagenumber:e1003884
Source:PLoS Pathogens 10(1): e1003884. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003884
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1003884
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=24453976
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Tag:RHO; activation; cells; domain; factor-I; laminin receptor; membrane; protein; toxin; translocation
Release Date:2015/08/29
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung