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Comparative proteome analysis of Milnesium tardigradum in early embryonic state versus adults in active and anhydrobiotic state

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-134447
  • Tardigrades have fascinated researchers for more than 300 years because of their extraordinary capability to undergo cryptobiosis and survive extreme environmental conditions. However, the survival mechanisms of tardigrades are still poorly understood mainly due to the absence of detailed knowledge about the proteome and genome of these organisms. Our study was intended to provide a basis for the functional characterization of expressed proteins in different states of tardigrades. High-throughput, high-accuracy proteomics in combination with aTardigrades have fascinated researchers for more than 300 years because of their extraordinary capability to undergo cryptobiosis and survive extreme environmental conditions. However, the survival mechanisms of tardigrades are still poorly understood mainly due to the absence of detailed knowledge about the proteome and genome of these organisms. Our study was intended to provide a basis for the functional characterization of expressed proteins in different states of tardigrades. High-throughput, high-accuracy proteomics in combination with a newly developed tardigrade specific protein database resulted in the identification of more than 3000 proteins in three different states: early embryonic state and adult animals in active and anhydrobiotic state. This comprehensive proteome resource includes protein families such as chaperones, antioxidants, ribosomal proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, transporters, protein channels, nutrient reservoirs, and developmental proteins. A comparative analysis of protein families in the different states was performed by calculating the exponentially modified protein abundance index which classifies proteins in major and minor components. This is the first step to analyzing the proteins involved in early embryonic development, and furthermore proteins which might play an important role in the transition into the anhydrobiotic state.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Elham Schokraie, Uwe Warnken, Agnes Hotz-Wagenblatt, Markus A. Grohme, Steffen Hengherr, Frank Förster, Ralph O. Schill, Marcus Frohme, Thomas Dandekar, Martina Schnölzer
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-134447
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Biologie / Theodor-Boveri-Institut für Biowissenschaften
Language:English
Parent Title (English):PLoS One
Year of Completion:2012
Volume:7
Issue:9
Pagenumber:e45682
Source:PLoS ONE 7(9): e45682. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0045682
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0045682
Dewey Decimal Classification:0 Informatik, Informationswissenschaft, allgemeine Werke / 00 Informatik, Wissen, Systeme / 004 Datenverarbeitung; Informatik
5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Tag:Yolk protein; arabidopsis thaliana; caenorhabditis elegans; expression; genes; life-span regulation; richtersius coronifer; superoxide-dismutase; tolerance; vitellogenin; water stress
Release Date:2017/07/13
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung