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Participatory Patterns in an International Air Quality Monitoring Initiative

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-151379
  • The issue of sustainability is at the top of the political and societal agenda, being considered of extreme importance and urgency. Human individual action impacts the environment both locally (e.g., local air/water quality, noise disturbance) and globally (e.g., climate change, resource use). Urban environments represent a crucial example, with an increasing realization that the most effective way of producing a change is involving the citizens themselves in monitoring campaigns (a citizen science bottom-up approach). This is possible byThe issue of sustainability is at the top of the political and societal agenda, being considered of extreme importance and urgency. Human individual action impacts the environment both locally (e.g., local air/water quality, noise disturbance) and globally (e.g., climate change, resource use). Urban environments represent a crucial example, with an increasing realization that the most effective way of producing a change is involving the citizens themselves in monitoring campaigns (a citizen science bottom-up approach). This is possible by developing novel technologies and IT infrastructures enabling large citizen participation. Here, in the wider framework of one of the first such projects, we show results from an international competition where citizens were involved in mobile air pollution monitoring using low cost sensing devices, combined with a web-based game to monitor perceived levels of pollution. Measures of shift in perceptions over the course of the campaign are provided, together with insights into participatory patterns emerging from this study. Interesting effects related to inertia and to direct involvement in measurement activities rather than indirect information exposure are also highlighted, indicating that direct involvement can enhance learning and environmental awareness. In the future, this could result in better adoption of policies towards decreasing pollution.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Alina Sîrbu, Martin Becker, Saverio Caminiti, Bernard De Baets, Bart Elen, Louise Francis, Pietro Gravino, Andreas Hotho, Stefano Ingarra, Vittorio Loreto, Andrea Molino, Juergen Mueller, Jan Peters, Ferdinando Ricchiuti, Fabio Saracino, Vito D.P. Servedio, Gerd Stumme, Jan Theunis, Francesca Tria, Joris Van den Bossche
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-151379
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Fakultät für Mathematik und Informatik / Institut für Informatik
Language:English
Parent Title (English):PLoS ONE
Year of Completion:2015
Volume:10
Issue:8
Pagenumber:e0136763
Source:PLoS ONE 10(8): e0136763 (2015). DOI: 10.1371/journal. pone.0136763
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal. pone.0136763
Dewey Decimal Classification:0 Informatik, Informationswissenschaft, allgemeine Werke / 00 Informatik, Wissen, Systeme / 004 Datenverarbeitung; Informatik
Tag:carbon; exposure; pollution; transport microenvironments
Release Date:2017/10/11
EU-Project number / Contract (GA) number:265432
OpenAIRE:OpenAIRE
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung 4.0 International