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Influence of Short-Term Glucocorticoid Therapy on Regulatory T Cells In Vivo

Please always quote using this URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-74749
  • Background: Pre- and early clinical studies on patients with autoimmune diseases suggested that induction of regulatory T(Treg) cells may contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids(GCs). Objective: We readdressed the influence of GC therapy on Treg cells in immunocompetent human subjects and naı¨ve mice. Methods: Mice were treated with increasing doses of intravenous dexamethasone followed by oral taper, and Treg cells in spleen and blood were analyzed by FACS. Sixteen patients with sudden hearing loss but without anBackground: Pre- and early clinical studies on patients with autoimmune diseases suggested that induction of regulatory T(Treg) cells may contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoids(GCs). Objective: We readdressed the influence of GC therapy on Treg cells in immunocompetent human subjects and naı¨ve mice. Methods: Mice were treated with increasing doses of intravenous dexamethasone followed by oral taper, and Treg cells in spleen and blood were analyzed by FACS. Sixteen patients with sudden hearing loss but without an inflammatory disease received high-dose intravenous prednisolone followed by stepwise dose reduction to low oral prednisolone. Peripheral blood Treg cells were analyzed prior and after a 14 day GC therapy based on different markers. Results: Repeated GC administration to mice for three days dose-dependently decreased the absolute numbers of Treg cells in blood (100 mg dexamethasone/kg body weight: 2.861.86104 cells/ml vs. 336116104 in control mice) and spleen (dexamethasone: 2.861.96105/spleen vs. 956226105/spleen in control mice), which slowly recovered after 14 days taper in spleen but not in blood. The relative frequency of FOXP3+ Treg cells amongst the CD4+ T cells also decreased in a dose dependent manner with the effect being more pronounced in blood than in spleen. The suppressive capacity of Treg cells was unaltered by GC treatment in vitro. In immunocompetent humans, GCs induced mild T cell lymphocytosis. However, it did not change the relative frequency of circulating Treg cells in a relevant manner, although there was some variation depending on the definition of the Treg cells (FOXP3+: 4.061.5% vs 3.461.5%*; AITR+: 0.660.4 vs 0.560.3%, CD127low: 4.061.3 vs 5.063.0%* and CTLA4+: 13.8611.5 vs 15.6612.5%; * p,0.05). Conclusion: Short-term GC therapy does not induce the hitherto supposed increase in circulating Treg cell frequency, neither in immunocompetent humans nor in mice. Thus, it is questionable that the clinical efficacy of GCs is achieved by modulating Treg cell numbers.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author: Martin Fassnacht, Silviu Sbiera, Thomas Dexneit, Sybille D. Reichardt, Kai D. Michel, Jens van den Brandt, Sebastian Schmull, Luitgard Kraus, Melanie Beyer, Robert Mlynski, Sebastian Wortmann, Bruno Allolio, Holger M. Reichardt
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:20-opus-74749
Document Type:Journal article
Faculties:Medizinische Fakultät / Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I
Language:English
Year of Completion:2011
Source:In: PLOS ONE (2011) 6:9, 10.1371/journal.pone.0024345
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
GND Keyword:Medizin
Release Date:2013/01/11
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung